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How to Increase Vanity Height

Bathroom vanities come in a variety of makes and models, but many of them have one feature in common -- height.

You can raise your bathroom vanity with wooden blocks.

Things You Will Need

  • Towel
  • Prybar
  • 2-by-4 or 2-by-6 wood blocks
  • Electric drill
  • Screws
  • Decorative material

Bathroom vanities come in a variety of makes and models, but many of them have one feature in common -- height.  The B4UBuild website states that the majority of bathroom vanities have a standing height of 29 inches, with marble vanity tops adding about another inch, meaning that most vanities are about the same height as a kitchen table. For a number of individuals, preference or height make the standard size too short for everyday use.  These people may look for a way to increase the height of their vanity.

  1. Turn off the water source and disconnect piping if the vanity contains a sink.
  2. Lay a towel on the floor around the vanity.
  3. Pry the vanity from the floor using a prybar, taking care to place the prybar on the towel to avoid damaging the floor.
  4. Screw the 2-by-4 or 2-by-6 wood blocks securely into the footprint of the vanity using a drill. Block size is dependent on the desired final height of the vanity. Don't place the blocks against the outer edge of the vanity's footprint or they may stick out when the vanity is replaced.
  5. Place the vanity on top of the blocks. Two or more people may be required to lift the vanity.
  6. Screw the vanity securely into the blocks.
  7. Install a decorative covering to hide the wood blocks. B4UBuild recommends matching the cabinet materials or wooden baseboard material or using ceramic tile to match the bath flooring, which gives a built-in appearance to the vanity.
  8. Reconnect any pipes and turn the water back on if necessary.
  9. Warning

    Plumbing or electrical work should be performed by professionals.

Things You Will Need

  • Towel
  • Prybar
  • 2-by-4 or 2-by-6 wood blocks
  • Electric drill
  • Screws
  • Decorative material

Warning

  • Plumbing or electrical work should be performed by professionals.

About the Author

Brad Chacos started writing professionally in 2005, specializing in electronics and technology. His work has appeared in Salon.com, Gizmodo, "PC Gamer," "Maximum PC," CIO.com, DigitalTrends.com, "Wired," FoxNews.com, NBCNews.com and more. Chacos is a frequent contributor to "PCWorld," "Laptop Magazine" and the Intuit Small Business Blog.

Photo Credits

  • Comstock/Comstock/Getty Images
  • Comstock/Comstock/Getty Images