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How to Kill Poison Ivy With Salt

The clusters of three leaves can help you spot poison ivy in your yard. The oil found in poison ivy can cause an allergic reaction on the skin. The plant causes pain, discomfort and an itchy feeling. Poison ivy can grow rapidly and needs to be killed to prevent it from spreading.

The clusters of three leaves can help you spot poison ivy in your yard.  The oil found in poison ivy can cause an allergic reaction on the skin. The plant causes pain, discomfort and an itchy feeling.  Poison ivy can grow rapidly and needs to be killed to prevent it from spreading. Instead of purchasing commercial products to remove the poison ivy, you can kill it with items that you have in your pantry.  The natural alternative will save money and help protect the environment.

  1. Pour 1 gallon of vinegar into a large cooking pot. Add 1 cup of salt to the vinegar.

  2. Place the large pot on the stove top over medium-high heat. Apply heat to the mixture until the salt dissolves completely. Stir the mixture periodically to help the salt dissolve.

  3. Remove the large pot from the stove top. Allow it to cool to room temperature and add 1 tbsp. of liquid dish soap.

  4. Place a funnel on the top of a spray bottle. Pour the solution into the spray bottle.

  5. Wear enough clothing to cover as much of your skin as possible. Wear gloves to protect your hands from the poison ivy.

  6. Spray the salt and vinegar solution on the poison ivy leaves and the roots of the weed. Continue to spray the poison ivy when new growth appears to prevent it from growing.

  7. Tip

    You can also pour the solution into a garden sprayer if you need to kill a large area of poison ivy.

    Warning

    Spray the solution carefully to avoid applying it to other plants because it can kill other vegetation.

Warning

  • Spray the solution carefully to avoid applying it to other plants because it can kill other vegetation.

About the Author

Angela LaFollette holds a Bachelor of Arts in advertising with a minor in political science from Marshall University. LaFollette found her passion for writing during an internship as a reporter for "The West Virginia Standard" in 2007. She has more than six years of writing experience and specializes in topics in garden and pets.