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Cooking Oil Paving Stain Remover

A paved walkway, patio or driveway enhances the appearance and value of a home. Despite efforts to keep them looking their best, however, an occasional spill creates a stain. Cleaning pavement can be tricky as it is an absorbent material that readily soaks up any liquid, including oil.

Keep paving clean with everyday items.

Things You Will Need

  • Paper towels
  • Talcum powder
  • Stiff-bristled brush
  • Liquid degreasing dish-washing soap
  • Sponge
  • Mechanic's hand cleaner

A paved walkway, patio or driveway enhances the appearance and value of a home.  Despite efforts to keep them looking their best, however, an occasional spill creates a stain.

Cleaning pavement can be tricky as it is an absorbent material that readily soaks up any liquid, including oil.  While cooking oil does not leave garish, dark stains on pavement, it will leave unattractive, tell-tale smudges.

A few everyday household items and bit of elbow grease removes the stain. 

  1. Cover the affected area with paper towels. Press firmly on the material, soaking up as much oil as possible. Do not rub as this will cause the stain to spread.
  2. Sprinkle talcum powder over the remaining oil. Rub the powder lightly with a stiff-bristled brush, working the absorbent material into the surface of the stain. Allow the powder to sit for 24 to 48 hours and then sweep the residue away.
  3. Pour liquid degreasing dish-washing soap over discolored areas. Scrub the soap briskly with a stiff-bristled brush, creating a light lather. Work from the edge of the stain toward the middle using small, circular motions to help loosen sticky oil residue. Rinse by sponging with cool water.
  4. Spread a layer of mechanic's hand cleaner over any stubborn stains. Rub the compound into the stain with a nylon scouring pad. Wait 10 minutes and wipe away with a wet cloth. The degreasing agents in the cleaner will break down the oil, making it easy to remove.
  5. Tip

    Older stains may require more than one treatment.

Things You Will Need

  • Paper towels
  • Talcum powder
  • Stiff-bristled brush
  • Liquid degreasing dish-washing soap
  • Sponge
  • Mechanic's hand cleaner

Tip

  • Older stains may require more than one treatment.

About the Author

Lisa Parris is a writer and former features editor of "The Caldwell County News." Her work has also appeared in the "Journal of Comparative Parasitology," "The Monterey County Herald" and "The Richmond Daily News." In 2012, Parris was honored with awards from the Missouri Press Association for best feature story, best feature series and best humor series.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Creatas/Getty Images
  • Jupiterimages/Creatas/Getty Images