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How to Fill Holes in Kitchen Cabinets

Your kitchen cabinets take up so much surface area in the kitchen that their very appearance can profoundly affect the rest of the kitchen. For example, if your cabinets look old and dingy, they can easily cause the rest of your kitchen to seem dingy as well.

Flawless cabinets make your kitchen look flawless.

Things You Will Need

  • Chalk
  • Wood putty
  • Putty knife
  • Small trowel
  • 150-grit sandpaper
  • Wax pencil
  • 3-inch nylon brush
  • Finish

Your kitchen cabinets take up so much surface area in the kitchen that their very appearance can profoundly affect the rest of the kitchen.  For example, if your cabinets look old and dingy, they can easily cause the rest of your kitchen to seem dingy as well.

However, you can keep your kitchen looking bright and pristine if you do basic maintenance to your cabinets.  Aside from cleaning your cabinets, filling in the holes they might acquire over time is also important.

  1. Examine your cabinets carefully. Look for small holes and circle each hole with a piece of chalk. Dab each hole with a small circle of wood putty and push the putty into each hole with a putty knife. Smooth out the surface with a trowel. Allow them to dry.
  2. Sand down the puttied holes with 150-grit sandpaper. Wipe down the cabinets with a tack cloth to remove the dust.
  3. Examine your kitchen cabinets carefully. Look for tiny little black or dark brown knots in the wood. These flaws aren't quite holes but from far away they can resemble holes. Dab each knot with a wax pencil in a shade that matches the wood of your cabinets.
  4. Dip the 3-inch nylon brush in the necessary finish. For example, if your cabinets have paint on them, go over your work in paint. If they've been varnished, use varnish.

Things You Will Need

  • Chalk
  • Wood putty
  • Putty knife
  • Small trowel
  • 150-grit sandpaper
  • Wax pencil
  • 3-inch nylon brush
  • Finish

About the Author

Lane Cummings is originally from New York City. She attended the High School of Performing Arts in dance before receiving her Bachelor of Arts in literature and her Master of Arts in Russian literature at the University of Chicago. She has lived in St. Petersburg, Russia, where she lectured and studied Russian. She began writing professionally in 2004 for the "St. Petersburg Times."

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/BananaStock/Getty Images
  • Jupiterimages/BananaStock/Getty Images