How to Make a Front Porch Swinging Bench

Making a swinging bench will transform any standard front porch into an appealing gathering place.
Waterproof varnish with stain and protect your porch swing.Waterproof varnish with stain and protect your porch swing.
Constructing a basic swinging bench provides additional front porch seating and a calming back-and-forth motion that encourages relaxation. A pine bench offers the strength to hold a person's body weight and is an affordable material available at any home supply store. Remember to coat your swing with wood stain to protect it from inclement weather and ward off ruin.

Step 1

Slide on a pair of work gloves, safety glasses and a dust mask to protect your skin, eyes and lungs.

Step 2

Smooth the surface and edges of two 1 3/4 inches by 3inches by 71 inches pine wood rails and two 3/4 inches by 3 inches by 25 inches pine wood rails with 120-grit sandpaper. Sand all subsequent rails and panels with 120-grit paper.

Step 3

Form the four rails together to make a 28 1/2 inch by 71 inch rectangle. Attach the rectangle together using a drill, 3/8-inch drill bit and 3/8-inch nuts, bolts and washers. Insert one bolt per corner. The 28 1/2 inch by 71 inch rectangle acts as the seat portion of the swing.

Step 4

Lay three 1 3/4 inches by 2 inches by 65 inches pine wood rails onto a work surface. Adjust the rails so the long edges are facing you in horizontal fashion and each rail is 6 inches apart.

Step 5

Lay one 1 3/4 inches by 2 inches by 24 inches pine wood rail in perpendicular fashion atop the three long rails. Adjust the 24-inch rail so it rests flush with the left edges of the horizontal rails and the far side short edge is flush with the top edge of the far side horizontal rail. Lay a second 1 3/4 inches by 2 inches by 24 inches pine wood rail in perpendicular fashion atop the three long rails. Adjust the second 24-inch rail so it rests flush with the right edges of the horizontal rails and the far side short edge is flush with the top edge of the far side horizontal rail. The 65-inch and 24-inch pieces represent the back support for the swing.

Step 6

Bond the back support together with 3/8-inch bolts, nuts and washers. Stand the back support upright so it is in perpendicular position to the seat. Center the back support along the back side rail of the seat. Bolt the bottom ends of the 24-inch back support legs to the seat with 3/8-inch bolts.

Step 7

Center and evenly space 15 of the 3/4 inch by 3 inches by 28 1/2 inches seat panels atop the seat. Bond the panels to the top of the seat frame with 2 1/2-inch wood screws. Drill one hole straight down through each of the four exposed seat rail ends to accommodate the porch swing ropes.

Step 8

Insert and knot the end of one 12-foot-long porch swing rope through the hole in the front left corner of the seat frame. Insert and knot the opposite end of the same rope through the hole in the back left corner of the seat frame.

Step 9

Insert and knot the end of one 12-foot-long porch swing rope through the hole in the front right corner of the seat frame. Insert and knot the opposite end of the same rope through the hole in the back right corner of the seat frame.

Step 10

Attach two 1 1/2-inch metal eye hooks into your porch roof at 71 inches apart. Hang your swing. Coat your swing with a waterproof varnish. Allow for a 24-hour drying time before sitting and relaxing on the swing.

Things You Will Need

  • Work gloves
  • Safety glasses
  • Dust mask
  • 2 - 1 3/4 inches by 3inches by 71 inches pine wood rails
  • 2 - 1 3/4 inches by 3 inches by 25 inches pine wood rails
  • 120-grit sandpaper
  • Drill
  • 3/8-inch drill bit
  • 3/8-inch nuts, bolts and washers (multiple)
  • 3 - 1 3/4 inches by 2 inches by 65 inches pine wood rails
  • 2 - 1 3/4 inches by 2 inches by 24 inches pine wood rails
  • 15 - 3/4 inch by 3 inches by 28 1/2 inches seat panels
  • 2 1/2-inch wood screws
  • 2 - 12-foot porch swing ropes
  • 2 - 1 1/2-inch metal eye hooks
  • Waterproof varnish
  • Paint brush

About the Author

Jeffery Keilholtz began writing in 2002. He has worked professionally in the humanities and social sciences and is an expert in dramatic arts and professional politics. Keilholtz is published in publications such as Raw Story and Z-Magazine, and also pens political commentary under a pseudonym, Maryann Mann. He holds a dual Associate of Arts in psychology and sociology from Frederick Community College.