How to Negotiate a Discount on Home Appliances

Consumers don't have to pay the full price on big-ticket items, such as appliances, if they're willing to put in a little effort in negotiating a better deal.

Price Matching

By negotiating for a lower price on a refrigerator, you may be able to afford a stove and microwave, too.By negotiating for a lower price on a refrigerator, you may be able to afford a stove and microwave, too.
The key to spending less on merchandise you want involves being persistent and having leverage. Shoppers also need to look at haggling more as a discussion with a sales association and less as a confrontation or argument. Taking the time to discuss your buying options with a sales associate can mean the difference between saving a few bucks and several hundred bucks.

Step 1

Research the prices of the appliances you want. Make note of what credible online merchants and brick-and-mortar merchants are charging for each product. Print out product descriptions, including the brand name and model number, along with the listed price or sales price.

Step 2

Look through weekly printed store circulars for sales on appliances. Identify the products you need and make note of what their current prices are and for how long the sale will last.

Step 3

Ask the store associate or manager of the company you want to patronize if they'll match the lowest price of a competitor. Express that you would like to bring your business to this store but that you're on a budget, so you hope a deal can be made.

Step 4

Ask for an incentive if at least two stores are carrying the appliance for the lowest price. Tell the sales associate or manager at one store that you aren't sure yet from whom you want to buy the appliance. Approach the the other store with the same question and mention what incentive the first store offered to see if it will top that.

Step 5

Offer suggestions for an incentive if the staff at the second store hesitates. Inquire about a free warranty, free delivery, a larger discount if you pay with cash, or an additional discount on another appliance.

Haggling

Step 1

Locate the appliance(s) you want and from the merchant you want to patronize. Go to the store when it first opens or during a weekday afternoon when there are fewer customers. Sales associates not only will vie for your business when the store's empty, but also are more likely to make a deal with you if other customers aren't around to overhear it.

Step 2

Praise the appliance in front of the sales associate, but point out that it's beyond your price range.

Step 3

Ask the associate when the item might be going on sale. Request to pay the sales price now because you plan on buying an appliance today, whether it's from this business or another.

Step 4

Stand silently after a deal is presented by the associate. Appear interested while looking at the appliance, but refrain from accepting the deal. Wait until the associate breaks the awkward silence with an additional discount.

Step 5

Ask for an additional discount if you offer to pay in cash. Businesses have to pay a surcharge to credit card companies with each use, so a customer who pays with cash or check saves the merchant that fee.

Things You Will Need

  • Print ads

Tips

  • Stores are less likely to work with you to match a price if you bring in prices from unfamiliar merchants off the Internet. Those listings could be outdated, inaccurate or fraudulent.
  • When price matching, be sure you're comparing the exact same products by checking model numbers.
  • Always try to speak with the person who can make the deal happen, such as a store manager. A sales associate may be hesitant to cut major deals without approval from a supervisor.quire about any discounts on floor models, discontinued models, or items with minor imperfections.
  • Be prepared to walk away if you don't get the discount you were wanting.

Warning

  • Don't be rude, pushy or demanding. Companies don't have to work with difficult customers, and may prefer you take your business elsewhere if you treat workers with disrespect. Inquiring about deals kindly but with assertiveness shows you're a savvy consumer, but not a rude person.

About the Author

Jennifer Pinto has been an editor and reporter since 1999, working with newspapers in the Midwest and on the East Coast. She serves as a contributor for several print and online publications, covering business, real estate, religion, home improvement and interior design. Pinto earned her B.A. in English and psychology at Northern Illinois University.