How to Make Bathroom Vanities

Bathroom vanities come in many shapes and sizes.

Building the Cabinet

Fits the Corner NicelyFits the Corner Nicely
Some have sinks in them and some do not. Most bathroom vanities are 30 inches tall including the sink top. In addition, their common depth is 22 inches, including the top. To change the height or depth of your bathroom vanity, lengthen the height of the end panels and the width of the shelf.

Place the two pieces of plywood measuring 29¼ inches tall (vanity end panels) on a worktable. Measure for one end and make a mark at 4 inches. Place the framing square on that mark and draw a line across the 20-inch width of the plywood.

Measure in from one of the long edges of the plywood and make a mark on the line drawn in Step 1 at 4 inches. Place the framing square on that mark and draw a line to the bottom of the end panel. This will create a 4-inch square in one corner of the end panel.

Cutout the square with the jig saw. Apply glue behind the cutout and below the line drawn in Step 1 and secure the 16-by-4-inch plywood to the end panels with the 3d box nails. These are known as cleats and support the bottom shelf.

Apply glue to the top edge of the cleats and place the plywood that is 28½ inches long on top of the cleats. This is the bottom shelf. Secure the bottom shelf through the end of panels in which 4d the finish nails.

Apply glue to the short edges of the 28½-by-4-inch plywood and secure it between the end of panels at the top and back of the bathroom vanity. This is called a nailing strip. Turn the cabinet over so nailing strip is facing up.

Apply glue to the edges of the two end panels, the bottom shelf and the nailing strip. Place the 30-by-25¼-by-¼-inch plywood on the back of the vanity and secure it with the 3d box nails.

Turn the bathroom vanity over so it is lying on its back. Apply glue to the front edges of the 4-inch square you cutout in Step 3, place the 30-by-4-inch plywood on the edges and secure it to the vanity with the 4d finish nails. This is the toe board of the vanity.

Face Frame and Doors

Place all of the 2-inch plywood on the worktable. Lay the two of the pieces so that their long sides are touching. Measure from one end and make a mark at 4½ and 6½ inches.

Place the framing square on the marks and draw a line across the 2-inch width of the plywood. Apply glue to the edges of the remaining 26-inch plywood and place one at the top and one at the bottom of the pieces from Step 1 and secure them together with the corrugated fasteners.

Place the remaining 2-inch piece on the lines drawn in Step 2 and secure it to the frame with the corrugated fasteners. Place the 4-by-7-by-½-inch plywood on the back of the face frame over the 4½-by-26-inch opening and secure it with the 1-inch brads.

Apply glue to the front edges of the end panels and the bottom shelf, place the face frame on the vanity and secure it to the vanity with the 4d finish nails. Install the hinges on the two pieces of plywood measuring 13½-by-16½ inches (doors) according to manufacturer's instruction. Install the doors on the vanity.

Secure the 5½-by-27-inch plywood to the face frame through the 4-by-7-inch pieces from Step 3 with the 1¾-inch drywall screws.

Things You Will Need

  • Two pieces of 20-by-29¼-by-¾-inch plywood
  • Framing square
  • Jig saw
  • Two pieces of 16-by-4-by-¾-inch plywood
  • Wood glue
  • 3d box nails
  • One piece of 28½-by-20-by-¾-inch plywood
  • 4d the finish nails
  • One piece of 28½-by-4-by-¾-inch plywood
  • One piece of 30-by-4-by-¾-inch plywood
  • One piece of 30-by-25¼-by-¼-inch plywood
  • Five pieces of 2-by-26-by-¾-inch plywood
  • Corrugated fasteners
  • Two pieces of 4-by-7-by-½-inch plywood
  • 1-inch brads
  • Two pieces of 13½-by-16½-by-¾-inch plywood
  • Two pairs of hinges
  • One piece of 27-by-5½-by-¾-inch plywood
  • Four 1¾-inch drywall screws

Tip

  • Build a smaller bathroom vanity with these instructions only make the bottom shelf, toe board and nailing strip shorter. Clean excess glue immediately with a damp cloth.

Warning

  • Do not leave power tools unattended in the presence of children. Do not paint or stain the bathroom vanity without proper ventilation.

About the Author

Michael Straessle has written professionally about the construction industry since 1988. He authored “What a Strange Little Man,” among other books, and his work has appeared in various online publications. Straessle earned a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in professional/technical writing.