How to Replace a Delta Shower Cartridge

The Delta Faucet Company uses cartridge faucets for its shower fixtures.

A cartridge faucet consists of a single plastic cylinder and a number of seals. Within the cartridge are mixing chambers. When the faucet's handle is turned, the mixing chambers turn to regulate the amount of water that exits the shower head, as well as the water's temperature. Cartridge faucets periodically require replacement, most commonly because the seals within the cartridge have cracked. Replacing a Delta Faucet Company shower cartridge takes only a few minutes.

Prevent the structure's water supply from entering the home by turning the shutoff valve next to the water meter in a clockwise direction.

Remove the cap which conceals the faucet handle's retaining screw by prying it free with a screwdriver. The cap is located in the center of the handle.

Remove the screw located in the center of the handle with a screwdriver, then pull the handle off of the faucet.

Remove the screw(s) that hold the trim plate in place with a screwdriver, then pull the plate away from the shower wall to reveal the cartridge.

Grasp the single bonnet nut which surrounds the end of the cartridge with a wrench, then unscrew the bonnet nut in a counterclockwise direction to remove it. Pull the cartridge out of the shower's wall.

Coat the O-ring located on the back of the replacement faucet with heat-proof grease, then insert the new cartridge into the assembly within the wall. Place the bonnet nut over the faucet, then tighten the nut with a wrench. Place the trim plate over the faucet assembly and against the shower wall, then install and tighten the plate's screw(s) with a screwdriver.

Slide the handle onto the end of the faucet, then install and tighten the handle's screw. Press the cap which conceals the faucet handle's retaining screw onto the end of the handle, then turn the structure's water supply back on by turning the shutoff valve next to the water meter in a counterclockwise direction to complete the replacement.

Things You Will Need

  • Screwdriver
  • Wrench
  • Heat-proof grease

About the Author

John Stevens has been a writer for various websites since 2008. He holds an Associate of Science in administration of justice from Riverside Community College, a Bachelor of Arts in criminal justice from California State University, San Bernardino, and a Juris Doctor from Whittier Law School. Stevens is a lawyer and licensed real-estate broker.