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DIY Table Saw Mobile Base

Making a mobile base for your table saw can be an inexpensive project with the most costly item being the locking swivel wheels. Mounting your table saw on a mobile base can make a small workshop more versatile and optimize your shop space. With your table saw on wheels, you can move it outside for projects in the yard or you can store it out of the way when not in use. Build a mobile base for a table saw, complete with a metal stand.

A mobile base for your table saw will optimize your shop space.
  1. Measure the distance between the feet of the metal stand. For the frame of the base, cut 4 pieces of 2 inch by 4 inch lumber one inch larger than the length and width of the bottom of the metal stand. For a center brace, cut one piece of 2 inch by 4 inch lumber the width of the base frame.

  2. Make half lap joints at the ends of the lumber for the frame. Mark one side of the ends of the 5 pieces of lumber to the width of the 2 inch by 4 inch lumber and half the thickness of the lumber. Use your table saw or radial arm saw to make a series of cuts half the thickness of the lumber, starting at your pencil mark and moving to the end of the lumber. With a sharp chisel, remove the cut wood to make the joint smooth. For the center brace, measure the center point of two opposing sides of the frame and mark the width of the 2 inch by 4 inch lumber and half the thickness of the lumber. Use the same technique for the overlapping joints as you did for the ends.

  3. Fit the pieces together dry to make sure the joints are flush. Separate the pieces of the frame and apply wood or carpenter's glue to both sides of the joints. Fit all glued joints together and use a carpenter's square to make sure the frame is square. Clamp the joints in place with C clamps and let dry. After removing the clamps, use a 3/32 inch drill bit to drill four screw pilot holes into each joint ½ inch from each side and secure into place with 10 by 1 ¼ inch wood screws.

  4. Cut four pieces of 2 inch by 4 inch lumber 8 inches long for corner braces. Cut a 45 degree angle on both ends of each piece of lumber. Apply glue to the angled face of one piece of the lumber. Fit the glued brace on the inside of one of the corners of the frame and clamp into place. Use a 3/32 inch drill bit to drill two countersunk pilot holes in each end of the brace and into the side of the frame. Secure it into place with 10 by 2 inch wood screws. Repeat with the other three corners.

  5. Flip the frame over. Set the heavy-duty 2 inch hard rubber locking swivel wheels into each corner of the frame ¾ inch from the edge. Mark the screw holes for the wheels and use the 3/32 inch drill bit to drill pilot holes. Screw the wheels into place. Turn the frame over and lock the wheels. Set the table saw on the frame and screw into place.

About the Author

James Paine began writing in 1973 as an assistant editor for "Canadian Insurance" magazine. He wrote all of the news and articles as managing editor of "FoodMart News." Paine attended Humber College in Etobicoke, Ontario, Canada, where he studied journalism.