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How to Lock Patio Furniture

Good-quality patio furniture can be an investment, and the best way to protect your investment may be to lock it up. Snow birds, people who spend their summers up north and their winters down south, may lock their furniture because no one will be at the property for months at a time. However, anyone with concerns about security can do so. You may want to consider it if you live in an urban area that provides easy access to your patio furniture.

Protect your investment with cables and locks.

Step 1

Weave one end of a steel cable coated in plastic, such as PVC, polypropylene or nylon, through one piece of patio furniture. You don't have to wrap the cord through all parts of each piece -- just one leg of the piece is sufficient.

Step 2

Bring the cord through the leg of a second piece of furniture. If it's long enough, go through a third piece.

Step 3

Secure as many pieces of the patio furniture together as possible. Make sure you have enough cord to reach back to the initial end so you can link both ends through a lock together.

Step 4

Insert the key in the padlock and turn to unlock it. Insert the hooked metal end through the loops on the ends of the cables. Turn the hooked end and line it up with the hole in the main part of the lock. Push the pieces together to lock it.

Step 5

Enter the combination to open the lock, if you're using this type. Put the hook part of the lock through the loops. Push the hooks back into the main section of the lock to secure it.

Step 6

Turn the dial or tumblers to clear the numbers if you're using a combination lock.

Step 7

Repeat the process until all pieces of your patio furniture are secure. The goal is to connect them all together, or at least several pieces together, to make it impossible for a thief to steal them.

About the Author

Based in New York State, Kelly Shetsky started writing in 1999. She is a broadcast journalist-turned Director of Marketing and Public Relations and has experience researching, writing, producing and reporting. She writes for several websites, specializing in gardening, medical, health and fitness, entertainment and travel. Shetsky has a Bachelor of Arts in communications from Marist College.