×

How a Jacuzzi Pump Works

The Jacuzzi pump was originally invented by the Jacuzzi family in California, where they created a new version of the whirlpool bath that was more compact and could be used in a variety of situations, including homes and hotels. The key feature of any Jacuzzi tub is the jet system, which spins a mixture of air and water into the main portion of the tub. There are many different versions of the Jacuzzi tub, but all follow the same basic system structure.

At the core of the Jacuzzi is a well pump that makes sure that the water continues to circulate. The pump is run by a motor. In the beginning, these were brush motors, but in 2010, most of these motors have been replaced with induction versions that run more quietly and have options to change speed, which alters the force from which the water is ejected from the jets. Jacuzzis also have small tubes that pump air into the system. This is what allows the jets to pump out a mixture of both air and water from the system. Many Jacuzzis also have controls that can alter how much air is pumped in with the water, adjusting the feel of the jets as well as the force.

About the Jacuzzi

Jacuzzi

The Jacuzzi pump was originally invented by the Jacuzzi family in California, where they created a new version of the whirlpool bath that was more compact and could be used in a variety of situations, including homes and hotels.  The key feature of any Jacuzzi tub is the jet system, which spins a mixture of air and water into the main portion of the tub. There are many different versions of the Jacuzzi tub, but all follow the same basic system structure At the core of the Jacuzzi is a well pump that makes sure that the water continues to circulate.  The pump is run by a motor. In the beginning, these were brush motors, but in 2010, most of these motors have been replaced with induction versions that run more quietly and have options to change speed, which alters the force from which the water is ejected from the jets.  Jacuzzis also have small tubes that pump air into the system. This is what allows the jets to pump out a mixture of both air and water from the system.  Many Jacuzzis also have controls that can alter how much air is pumped in with the water, adjusting the feel of the jets as well as the force.

Jacuzzi Pumping Process

Inside the Jacuzzi pump, the motor turns a small rotor, a bladed device that draws in water to the pump housing.  Inside this housing, pressure is built up so that the pump can expel the water with as much force as directed by the pump controls. Pump housings can vary, but in Jacuzzis they are usually simple devices that use centrifugal force powered by the motor to spin the water and create enough pressure to pump it quickly to the jets.  Some Jacuzzis may have heating devices that heat the water as it is pumped back to the jets. Another key distinction between Jacuzzi tubs and similar products, such as hot tubs, is that the Jacuzzi is almost always emptied of water after it has been used, while the water in spas and hot tubs remains in the tub and is treated.  However, there are a number of variations. Some Jacuzzi tubs have dry-run mechanisms that allow the motors to be protected in case the system is turned on when the tub is empty.  Others are equipped with devices that shut the motor down if anything gets caught in the pump. The type of the pump is also very important to the function of the system.  A 1 horsepower motor will be much more limited than a 3 horsepower system.

Jets

Jacuzzis come with three primary types of jets.  Eyeball jets are spherical versions that can be adjusted and pointed in different directions. They have high pressure, but cannot eject a large amount of water over a short amount of time.  Directional jets are similar, but larger. They are made of sturdier materials for more powerful jets of water used for massage or similar activities.  Rotating jets are designed to pulse water in all directions for a more gentle feeling. Most Jacuzzis have all three of these jets, which work together in concert.  The pump generates the pressure, which builds as the water is pushed through the small jets.

About the Author

Tyler Lacoma has worked as a writer and editor for several years after graduating from George Fox University with a degree in business management and writing/literature. He works on business and technology topics for clients such as Obsessable, EBSCO, Drop.io, The TAC Group, Anaxos, Dynamic Page Solutions and others, specializing in ecology, marketing and modern trends.

Photo Credits