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Methods of Packaging Glass & Ceramic

Ceramic dishes, glass vases or champagne flutes are all the fragile items that you love to use but will dread packing when your next moving day rolls around. Don't anticipate chipped dishes; plan ahead and pack cautiously. Keep in mind that packing in layers will minimize movement during the shipping of your precious porcelain or crystal.

Cushioning

Keep your fragile possessions safely packaged in bubblewrap and packing peanuts.

Layering your fragile piece in different packing materials is one of the safest ways to keep your item from breaking while in transit. If you are packing a glass or ceramic vase or drinking glass, fill it with packing peanuts to keep the inside layered and cushioned. Wrap your glass or ceramic piece in tissue paper, and use bubble wrap to add another buffer and prevent impressions from appearing on your glassware.

Once you gently enclose the first set of layers with masking tape, it's best to place the item into a small box filled with packing peanuts or foam pieces before putting it in the larger shipping box. Keeping the item wrapped and packed in a smaller box further minimizes the possibility for breakage.

Layering

Placing layers on the inside of your shipping box -- instead of packing each item in an individual box -- is ideal for stacking fragile items, such as ceramics and glassware. Create a moderate layer of bubble wrap, packing pellets or foam at the bottom of the box. Wrap each individual dish or glass in old newspaper, and secure it with strips of tape. Use bubble wrap if you have extra fragile items. Stack your items in the box from heaviest to lightest, bottom to top respectively, and add a final layer of packing material on top for added cushion before sealing up the box. The last layer will keep your glass and ceramic pieces from shifting in the box during the move.

Slot Boxes

If you want to keep your packing as simple as possible, opt for boxes that offer individual slots for your items. For example, stemware boxes provide individual slots for glasses. It is still recommended to wrap each glass with at least one sheet of bubble wrap or newspaper for added absorption shock and to fill small spaces with packing filler, but the individual slots create a more stable environment for your items -- requiring less wrapping and less worrying.

About the Author

Candace M. Sheppard is a multimedia journalist living in New York City. She has produced original video pieces for CUNY TV and worked as an assistant editor for home fashions trade magazine, LDB Interior Textiles. She is currently co-producing a docu-series about a hip-hop dance subculture in New York City.

Photo Credits

  • bunte vase im detail image by Wolfgang Peinelt from Fotolia.com