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How to Deadhead Impatiens

Lynn Rademacher

Flowering annuals bring bright colors to gardens and hanging baskets starting with the first blooms of spring through the summer and into autumn. However, many annual flowering plants need a little help to look their best and benefit from deadheading. Deadheading is the removal of spent blooms and foliage.

Impatiens are an easy to care for annual flower.

Impatiens generally don’t require deadheading as they are a self-cleaning plant that naturally sheds spent blooms, according to North Carolina State University Extension. However, even impatiens can benefit from deadheading if the plant has become stressed and has lost the majority of its blooms at the same time.

  1. Inspect the impatiens for blooms that are wilting or are turning brown, as well as for any dead leaves or stems, advises online resource Creative Homemaking.

  2. Grasp the plant 1/4 inch below the bloom with the thumb and forefinger and pinch the entire bloom off the plant. Discard the detached flower.

  3. Water and fertilize the impatiens with a water-soluble flower fertilizer. Keep soil moist. The impatiens should return to full bloom approximately one week after a severe deadheading.

The Drip Cap

  • Flowering annuals bring bright colors to gardens and hanging baskets starting with the first blooms of spring through the summer and into autumn.
  • However, many annual flowering plants need a little help to look their best and benefit from deadheading.
  • Discard the detached flower.