Where Does a Foam Mattress Pad Go on My Bed?

Any foam mattress pad can be added to the top of a standard mattress, under the fitted sheet.

Function

Foam mattress pads are used as mattress toppersFoam mattress pads are used as mattress toppers
Eggshell foam pads are one option for adding comfort and support to a mattress, but memory foam mattress pads have become more popular since they came on the market in the late 1990s. Memory foam mattress pads are becoming a popular and cost-effective way to get the comfort of a foam mattress on an existing standard bed.

A memory foam mattress pad gives you added comfort and support by completely conforming to your body and relieving pressure points. It can also help prolong the life of your mattress by reducing surface wear.

Effects

The "memory" in memory foam comes from the molding that occurs when you lie on it. The foam cells are temperature sensitive and become more elastic and viscous with your body heat, so the cells compress and mold around you to fully support your body.

Types

There are different foam densities available. Higher density foams will have 5 pounds or greater density, while medium density foam is in the 3- to 4-pound range. Foam mattress pads also come in different thicknesses, with most falling between 2 to 4 inches thick. A thicker pad will provide more cushion and molding, but be aware of the need for deep-pocket fitted sheets.

Features

Foam density will determine how soft or firm the mattress pad will be at room temperature. A high-density foam will stay firm and provide more support, while lower densities will be softer and will take slightly longer to return to their original shape after you leave the bed.

Considerations

According to the manufacturers behind Healthy Foundations Memory Foam Mattresses, some deeply discounted memory foam is very low density and may have sand or other fillers mixed into the foam when it's poured. Avoid extremely inexpensive foam mattress pads if there's any question of quality.

About the Author

Aubrey Kerr is a writer and photographer. With a B.A. in media arts and public relations, she has helped small business owners design and implement online marketing campaigns since 2004. Her work appears on several websites including Salon.com and the Houston Chronicle.