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How to Glue Paneling to Walls

Adding paneling to walls is a fast way to transform the interior of any room. Paneling is sturdy enough to last but it is generally inexpensive enough to be a viable option for remodeling a room. Although there are many ways to apply and mount paneling, gluing is probably the simplest and least arduous method. The steps below will show how to mount paneling with glue the correct way, leaving an attractive and professional-looking end result.

Wall Paneling

Clean and dry the walls that will be paneled using the rags or towels. Simple soap and water will suffice.

Remove loose wallpaper if present. Panels can be applied directly to bare wall studs or on top of drywall or other pre-existing walls.

Measure the length of each section of wall to figure how many wall panels will be needed from corner to corner. Record these measurements.

Use a circular saw to cut the paneling according to your measurements to make them fit each section of wall.

Apply the glue in a zigzag pattern to the back of each panel, one at a time. Space each zigzag about 6 inches from the next to avoid using too much glue.

Press and hold the panels to the wall one at a time. Follow the glue manufacturer's instructions for time to be held in place and curing times.

Repeat these steps until the room is completed. Pay extra attention to corner pieces and glue around corners according to the manufacturer's instructions to ensure a firm hold.

Things You Will Need

  • Wood or all-purpose glue
  • Rags or old towels
  • Circular saw
  • Measuring tape
  • Soap and water

Tips

  • Measure, cut and mount only one wall section of paneling at a time. This will avoid confusion or getting pre-cut panels mixed up.
  • Follow directions for the glue to ensure that too much is not used. Overflowing glue along the sides of the paneling is very hard to remove once dried.

About the Author

Jesse Futch began writing professionally in 2008. He writes for various websites, including eHow, specializing in topics such as family, technology, travel, history and science. Futch is self-taught in the field of writing. He studied U.S. history, software engineering and missile and space systems at U.S. Air Force Technical College.

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