How to Calculate Hardwood Floor Cost

Hardwood floors add value to a home, and, because a solid hardwood floor can be refinished multiple times, the value does not depreciate over time.

Calculating costs in advance can help avoid sticker shock.Calculating costs in advance can help avoid sticker shock.
If you're considering having hardwood installed in your home, you may be wondering what is involved and how to calculate the actual flooring cost for your room. By being aware of all materials required for the installation, you can shop for your floor without worrying about sticker shock when you get the final installation quote.

Measure the installation area and determine the amount of hardwood flooring that will be installed, by multiplying the length and width of each room. Remember to include unseen areas such as closets and pantries. This number is the actual installation area.

Add ten percent to your installation area; this is the average amount of flooring that will be wasted during the cutting process. This is the total amount of required flooring for the job.

Examine the package of the hardwood you have chosen to find the quantity of square feet per package; divide the amount per package into the total amount required and round up to the next whole number. This is the number of packages of hardwood you will need to purchase.

Determine the number of nails or staples per package. You will need to fasten the hardwood every eight to 10 inches and will use approximately 4000 fasteners per 500 square feet of flooring installed for a standard plank width. Round up fasteners required to the next full package.

Decide what transition pieces will be needed to finish your hardwood floor. These are the pieces to be used where the floor ends at doorways. Include these pieces in the total calculation of the hardwood flooring cost. They will vary depending on the type of flooring or doorway the hardwood ends at. For example, a reducer transition may be required if the hardwood meets carpet, while a threshold or end piece transition may be required for an entry door.

Tips

  • Quarter-round molding may be reused after the flooring has been installed.
  • Always round up when measuring for flooring installations.
  • Rooms with odd walls or angles may require more cutting, so you should add 15 percent for cutting waste, instead of ten percent, if your room has different-shaped areas.
  • If you're renting a nailer or other tools, remember to include the cost in your calculations.

About the Author

Robin Hewitt began her writing career in 2008. She is the coauthor of several books, including "The Joyous Gift of Grandparenting," which covers the nutritional and fitness needs of both grandchildren and grandparents.