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How to Troubleshoot a Hoveround Scooter

Like electric wheelchairs, personal electric scooters such as the Hoveround provide increased mobility and independence to those either confined to or occasionally in need of a wheelchair. The scooters run on electric motors and can come with a number of features including a swivel seat. If your Hoveround scooter is not working correctly, troubleshoot a few possible problems at home before calling a repair technician.


Electric scooters such as those made by Hoveround allow individuals to retain their mobility.
  1. Test your Hoveround scooter's battery level using a battery tester. Test the battery immediately after you disconnect the scooter from the battery charger to determine how much power the batteries are holding. If the batteries are not storing the recommended level of power, replace them.
  2. Check the air pressure on the main wheels of the scooter using a tire pressure gauge. Depending on its design, it may have four or six wheels. Four-wheel models, a traditional design, have four air-inflated wheels. Six-wheel versions have two larger drive wheels located on a center axle, along with four smaller spherical wheels used for stability. If the air pressure has become low in the tires, the scooter will use more power to move and will drain the battery more quickly.
  3. Inspect the small ball wheels on your scooter. Look in the crevices between the housing and moving part of the wheel for small stones or other debris that may affect how well the wheels roll.
  4. Inspect and clean the battery cables and connections. If you see any corrosion on the battery posts where the cables connect, use a wire brush to clean the posts. Tighten the cable connections to ensure efficient transfer of power from the battery to the motor.
  5. Remove the panel from the scooters fuse box, and inspect the fuses. Replace blown fuses with a new one with the same amperage tolerance.

Things You Will Need

  • Battery meter
  • Tire pressure gauge
  • Wire brush

About the Author

Since 2002 Mark Spowart has been working as a freelance writer and photographer in London, Canada. He has publication credits for writing and/or photography in Canada, The United States, Europe and Norway, with such titles as "The Globe & Mail," "The National Post," Canada News Wire, Sun Media and "Business Edge" magazine.

Photo Credits