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How to Add Lattice Skirting to a Deck

Lattice skirting can go around the outside perimeter of a deck and reaches from the deck floor to the ground. The latticing blocks the view under the deck. You can use stained wood lattice, bare lattice that you can stain yourself later, or colored plastic lattice. Installing latticing around your deck is simple and just involves measuring, cutting, and screwing it into place. Once it is in place, it will give your deck a more finished look.

Step 1

Measure the distance from the bottom of the deck to the ground. Take the measurement every 12 inches around the deck. Transfer these measurements to the lattice with a pencil.

Step 2

Lay the lattice on a sawhorse and use a circular saw to cut the decking at the marks you have made. This will leave you with lattice that will fit under your deck perfectly.

Step 3

Use an electric drill and deck screws to attach 2-by-4 blocks every 3 feet along the bottom of the deck. The top 2 inches of the block should sit behind the rim joist so the bottom 2 inches hang down below the joist. This is where you will attach the lattice.

Step 4

Move the lattice into place under the deck. Screw the lattice into the blocks you attached to the joists every 3 feet around the bottom of the deck. Use deck screws and the electric drill.

Step 5

Drive wooden stakes on the inside of the lattice if your deck is more than 2 feet above the ground. Attach lattice to the stakes with screws. This will keep the lattice from being pushed in from the outside.

Things You Will Need

  • Measuring tape
  • Pencil
  • Sawhorse
  • Circular saw
  • 4 inch long 2-by-4 blocks
  • Deck screws
  • Electric drill
  • 1-by-2 wooden stakes (optional)

Tip

  • If your deck has wooden beams underneath it that are in the way of the lattice, you can use the circular saw to cut notches in the lattice to fit around the beams.

About the Author

Based in Richmond, Va., Dawn Gibbs writes about topics such as history, fashion, literature, crafts, alternative medicine and healthy living. Her work has appeared on GreenDaily.com and several style websites. Gibbs holds a Bachelor of Arts in history from Virginia Commonwealth University.