My Roper Dryer Is Making Noise

If your Roper clothes dryer is making a noise that you believe is not normal, figuring out the cause can save you from an expensive call to a repair technician in some cases.

Clanging Sound

While some problems will need to be addressed by qualified repair personnel, some noises resonating from your dryer can be handled easily and without additional help. Listen closely and try to describe the noise. Different noises will indicate specific problems with the dryer.

If the noise coming from your dryer can be described as a clanging sound, the solution is probably well within your grasp. This common sound is typically the result of loose debris accidentally put in with the load of laundry. Change may be left in pockets of pants or other objects may be dropped in the laundry basket by children --- perhaps a toy car. The objects may not be noticed when put into the wash, and the water in the washer may have dampened the sound. Simply remove these items, and restart the dryer to resolve the issue.

Sometimes the clanging is from snaps or buttons that are actually part of the clothing. If you are drying a jacket with metal snaps or another garment with metal attached, you should expect this clanging sound as they tumble and strike the inside of the dryer tub.

Humming or Whistling

Many Roper dryer models are equipped with a safety feature known as a lint signal, which is usually a light that often accompanies a warning signal, telling the machine owner that the lint trap has become clogged. When the dryer cannot pull adequate air through the lint filter, it can overheat and become a fire hazard. The warning alarm may sound like a hum or whistle to get your attention. Look at the lint signal light, clean out the trap and the noise should stop.

Thumping or Grinding

If the noise you are hearing can be described as a thumping sound or a metal grinding sound, the device that turns the dryer drum, known as the drum rollers or glides, can be worn out. As the drum turns, there may be a constant and rhythmic thump each time the drum rotates. A severely worn or broken roller could cause the metal of the drum to rub against the metal housing of the machine, causing a louder grinding noise. The rollers will need to be replaced to remedy the problem.

Squeaking or Squealing

Most dryers work by using belts to turn the rollers, which in turn make the drum rotate and tumble the clothes dry. When these belts get loose, a worn belt or a malfunctioning tensioner spring may keep the belt tight. In either case, belt slippage may occur and will produce a squeaking or squealing sound that is easily recognized. The problem is likely to be the tension on the belt since most belts will break before wearing out to this degree.

About the Author

Lee Morgan is a fiction writer and journalist. His writing has appeared for more than 15 years in many news publications including the "Tennesseean," the "Tampa Tribune," "West Hawaii Today," the "Honolulu Star Bulletin" and the "Dickson Herald," where he was sports editor. He holds a Bachelor of Science in mass communications from Middle Tennessee State University.