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How to Get a Stain Out of a Chenille Sofa

Chenille yarn, made from various fabrics such as cotton, olefin and rayon, provides a soft and luxurious feel to sofa furniture. The fabric has two features: short filament lengths called pile encased in a firmer yarn known as the core.

Use a dry-cleaning solvent to remove stains from a chenille sofa.

Chenille yarn, made from various fabrics such as cotton, olefin and rayon, provides a soft and luxurious feel to sofa furniture. The fabric has two features: short filament lengths called pile encased in a firmer yarn known as the core. Cleaning a stain that has sunk into the chenille fabric involves using a delicate balance to remove the blemish without pulling out or damaging the yarn.

  1. Wet a white paper towel with water and squeeze out the excess liquid. Gently dab at the stain on the chenille sofa, working from the outside edges of the mark towards the center. Avoid rubbing the fabric with the paper towel and blot only. Remove as much of the stain that will lift from the chenille sofa.

  2. Apply 1/2 tsp. dry cleaning solvent to a clean white cloth. Softly blot the remaining stain with the cleaner. Inspect the stain after blotting for 20 seconds. If the stain remains, continue adding additional solvent to the cloth and blotting the stain until it disappears.

  3. Brush the affected area lightly with a soft baby brush to restore the fabric and remove any flat or matted areas caused from the cleaning procedure.

  4. Tip

    Clean a chenille sofa weekly with light vacuuming. Avoid placing the chenille sofa in direct sunlight. Test the dry cleaning solvent on a hidden area of the sofa before applying to the stain. Ventilate the room by opening windows or running a fan when using the dry cleaning solvent. Brush the nap on chenille sofa cushions towards the front for better wear on the fabric.

    Warning

    Do not use cleaning products containing carbon tetrachloride on chenille fabric because of their toxic content.

Warning

  • Do not use cleaning products containing carbon tetrachloride on chenille fabric because of their toxic content.

About the Author

Constance Barker, located in the hills of southern Ohio, is the owner and writer of several financial, credit report and travel websites. She started writing in 1999 for private clients and began creating website content in 2004. She gained expertise in home improvement after she and her husband built their home themselves.