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How to Dye a Canopy Net

A canopy net is an ideal method of preventing insects from flying into your bed. Many of these nets are sold solid white, allowing you to alter the net as you desire. Dying your canopy net to match your bedroom decor is a simple process. According to Mosquito Nets.com, the best dye for canopy nets is washing machine dye. This dyeing method colors your nets quickly and leaves little room for error.

Mosquito canopy nets are used to protect you from flying insects during sleeping hours.

Step 1

Fill your washing machine with hot water on the large load setting. Water must be hot to ensure even coverage of your net and prevent shrinking.

Step 2

Dissolve one to four packets, depending on the size and weight of your netting, of dye powder in 2 cups of hot water. Stir it in until it is completely mixed. Leaving behind lumps or small particles will cause the dye to splotch your netting.

Step 3

Add the dye to your washing machine once it is completely filled with hot water. This is referred to as a dye bath.

Step 4

Pass your canopy net through hot tap water in your sink. Ensure the entire net is moistened with the hot water. Smooth out creases and folds in the net once it is wet. Add to they dye bath.

Step 5

Close the lid of your washer and begin the "Extended Wash" cycle to allow ample time for the dye to penetrate your net's fibers. It may take 30 minutes to an hour for your net to absorb the correct shade. Allow your washer to run through the entire cycle.

Step 6

Remove your canopy net from the washer and rinse in cool water until your water runs clear. According to Glitz and Glamour, darker shades will require additional washing in a mild detergent. Wash these nets in cool water.

Step 7

Place your canopy net in the dryer or on a clothesline in the sun. Hang the net over your bed once it is completely dry. Hanging it wet can cause dripping and bleeding of color onto your sheets, even after rinsing.

About the Author

Sharin Griffin has been a freelance writer since 2009, specializing in health-related articles. She has worked in the health-care industry as a certified nursing assistant and medical technician. Griffin's medical expertise encompasses bariatrics and geriatric care, with an emphasis on general medicine. She is completing an associate degree in health-care administration from Axia University.