How to Get Termites out of Carpet

Similar to ants, termites live in colonies.
Carpeting is a termite delicacy.Carpeting is a termite delicacy.
King and queen termites mate for life, with the queen producing upwards of 2000 eggs per day. Once these ravenous residents invade your home, they continue to multiply at a rapid pace, feasting on whatever cellulose is available in an effort to satisfy the brood. While wood and paper are their usual delicacy, it is not unusual for termites to acquire a taste for carpeting. If termites are destroying your carpeting, get rid of them with a dust shower.

Step 1

Sprinkle the sodium borate over the carpeting. Do not hold back; sprinkle it liberally. By the time you are through sprinkling, a thin layer of sodium borate should be visible on the carpet surface.

Step 2

Wait a minimum of five days before vacuuming. It may seem like a long time, but the sodium borate needs time to work its magic. Once the termites begin eating the sodium borate, they usually die within a five-day window, so be patient.

Step 3

Vacuum the carpeting after the five-day waiting period. As you vacuum, you will be sucking up the sodium borate and the dead termites. Since there is a chance that some termites may be alive, throw the vacuum bag in a plastic garbage bag immediately after vacuuming, and seal it tightly. Dispose of the bag in an outside trash can.

Things You Will Need

  • Sodium borate
  • Vacuum
  • Garbage bag
  • Outside trash can

Tip

  • Over the course of five days, the sodium borate will work its way into the carpet, rendering itself practically invisible. Sodium borate is not toxic to humans or pets.

Warning

  • If the termites are in your carpet, there is a good chance that they are also in other areas of your home. If, despite your best efforts to rid your carpet of termites, their population continues to grow, seek professional help.

About the Author

Jonae Fredericks started writing in 2007. She also has a background as a licensed cosmetologist and certified skin-care specialist. Jonae Fredericks is a certified paraeducator, presently working in the public education system.