How to Build an Angled Shoe Rack

If you have a large collection of shoes, then you may have to deal with the shoes taking up a great deal of space in your closet and potentially causing a clutter problem.
One way to get around this issue is to make a shoe rack, which is a series of shelves used to hold shoes. Although a flat shoe rack will function well, angling the rack will make it easier for you to see and grab your shoes, which is invaluable when you are in a hurry.

Step 1

Diagram the size of the shoe rack that you desire and mark off the spaces for each shelf on your wall. This will help you determine how long you want each shelf on the rack to be, as well as the number of shelves you will make. The height between different shelves is your own decision, but you should allow at least one foot between each shelf. Use this opportunity to look for studs in the walls, which will allow you to avoid the use of anchors.

Step 2

Cut the boards to your desired length.

Step 3

Screw the adjustable angle wall brackets to the boards using the 1/2-inch screws. The adjustable wall brackets are designed to allow you to tilt your shelves to different angles, instead of having them be perpendicular to the wall. Adjustable wall brackets can be found at hardware stores or online. The 1/2-inch screws will firmly anchor the boards but won't fully penetrate the boards and come out the other side. If necessary, use your electric drill to make a small hole to facilitate the insertion of the screws.

Step 4

Mount the wall brackets to the wall using the 1 1/2-inch screws. If you are having trouble aligning the screws with studs in the wall or your wall is unable to handle the weight of the shelf and shoes combination, you may need to first insert drywall anchors for additional support. If you are having trouble inserting the screws, drill a hole to make it easier.

Step 5

Set the adjustable angle wall brackets to the angle that you desire to create an angled shoe rack. If you are having problems with shoes falling off the shelves and do not want to reduce the angle of the shelves, affixing a small amount of trim with wood glue to the end of the shelf will help keep the shoes in place.

Things You Will Need

  • Adjustable angle wall brackets, 2 per shelf
  • 1/2-inch-thick and 12-inches-wide boards, length and number determined by desired rack dimensions
  • 1/2-inch screws, 4 per shelf
  • 1 1/2-inch #6 screws, 2 per shelf
  • Drywall anchors (optional)
  • Screwdriver
  • Electric drill
  • Saw (optional)
  • Trim and wood glue (optional)

About the Author

Adam Cloe has been published in various scientific journals, including the "Journal of Biochemistry." He is currently a pathology resident at the University of Chicago. Cloe holds a Bachelor of Arts in biochemistry from Boston University, a M.D. from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. in pathology from the University of Chicago.