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Shampooing Upholstered Furniture

Vacuuming your upholstered furniture regularly helps keep it clean, but nothing freshens it up like a good shampoo. Rather than pay a professional to perform this task, save your valuable money and learn how to do it yourself with a few common household items.

Step 1

Vacuum the furniture with a brush attachment. Removing surface dust and dirt will help prevent these impediments from being ground into your furniture as you shampoo it.

Step 2

Place a large towel on the floor in front of the upholstered piece. This is where you will place the two bowls and sponge as you shampoo your furniture.

Step 3

Fill a small bowl or bucket with cool water. Set it aside.

Step 4

Squirt about 2 tablespoons of mild liquid dish soap into another medium-sized bowl or bucket. Turn on your faucet and wait for the water to turn very warm but not hot. Fill it with about 4 cups of water, or until a surge of bubbles forms.

Step 5

Dip a clean sponge about halfway into the sudsy water. Squeeze it out gently so that it doesn’t drip. You should have a fairly even distribution of water and soap on the sponge.

Step 6

Begin shampooing your furniture, working from the top down and on one small section at a time. Dab the furniture with the sponge and then work the suds into the furniture in a circular motion. As the sponge dries out, immerse the sponge in the suds again and reapply.

Step 7

Dip the second sponge into the bowl or bucket filled only with water once you are confident that you have removed a stain or the furniture is clean. Continue shampooing your furniture in this manner — applying the soap and then removing the soap residue with a damp sponge — until you are finished.

Step 8

Let your furniture dry naturally or, if you’re in a hurry, wipe it with a clean towel. In the latter case, it still may take a few hours for the moisture to completely evaporate. Go over your furniture with a fine-bristle brush — and in one direction only — to restore the look of matted-down fibers.

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