How to Make a Lattice Fence

Lattice fences can serve a variety of functions.
Lattice FenceLattice Fence
They can divide outdoor spaces, provide privacy, keep pets in an area or children safe. Anyone with basic carpentry skills can put up a basic post and lattice fence.

Step 1

Lattice fence

Lay out and mark the fence line. You can use landscaping paint or stakes and strings. Mark the locations for the posts. Try putting them 8 feet apart on center. This is a common width of lattice fence panels.

Step 2

Garden fence

Measure and cut 4x4 posts to the determined height of your fence, plus 24 inches.

Step 3

Man digging hole

Dig the holes for the posts. Make the holes 24 inches deep, and compact the soil at the bottom of the hole firmly with a tamper. Set the posts in the holes, and add bag(s) of ready-mix concrete. Make sure the post is set plumb, and allow the concrete to cure for 24 hours.

Step 4

Chickens in garden

Set one vertical end of a 4x8 lattice panel on the vertical center line of the end fence post. Set the other end of the lattice panel in a similar way on the center line of the next post.

Step 5

Man with drill

Use the electric drill to make pilot holes on each edge of the lattice panels every 12 inches. Attach the lattice panels to the posts by drilling galvanized wood screws through the pilot holes and into the posts.

Step 6

Man cutting lumber

Measure and cut horizontal members for the fence. Cut 2x4 lumber into 8-foot pieces, and attach them to the posts at the top and bottom edges of the lattice panels. Repeat on the other side, and your fence is complete.

Things You Will Need

  • Shovel
  • Hand tamper
  • Measuring tape
  • Circular saw
  • 4x4 posts
  • 4x8 lattice panels
  • 2x4 lumber
  • Electric drill
  • Galvanized screws

Warning

  • Before any digging, call utility companies and have them mark the location of any underground lines.

About the Author

Anthony Smith began writing for Demand Studios in May of 2009 and has since written over 1400 articles for them. He also writes for "The College Baseball Newsletter." He attended the University of New Mexico, and has more than 25 years of experience in the business world.