How to Remove Tomato Soup Stains

Like other food stains that are bright in color and high in acids, tomato soups stains can intimidate even a seasoned launderer.

Tomato soup stains can be removed from clothing with a few items.Tomato soup stains can be removed from clothing with a few items.
Luckily, tomato soup stains can be removed from almost all types of fabrics, regardless of type or color. By implementing a few stain-removal techniques, you can eliminate the tomato stain and reclaim your stain-free fabric.

Blot the stain as soon as you notice it or as soon as it is spilled on the fabric. Do this gently as not to force the stain farther into the fabric fibers, but thoroughly to remove any additional liquid, advises the Stain Solver website.

Apply a liquid detergent directly to the stained area. If the fabric is colored, do not use a detergent that contains bleach. You can apply the detergent with a soft cloth or gentle scrub brush.

Allow the detergent to sit on the stain for an hour.

Launder the fabric as you normally would. If after washing the fabric the stain remains, continue to Step 5.

Soak the fabric in a water and vinegar solution. Combine 1 gallon of water with 2 cups of vinegar and place the fabric directly into the solution, allowing it to soak for one or two hours. Vinegar should help to neutralize the acid in the stain, according to the Tipking website.

Launder the fabric as you normally would. Repeat the steps until the stain is gone.

Things You Will Need

  • Soft cloth
  • Liquid detergent
  • Scrub brush
  • Bucket
  • Warm water
  • Vinegar

Tip

  • Don't dry your fabric until you have successfully eliminated the stain. Drying the fabric could seal it to the fibers, and you will have a much harder time removing the stain.

Warning

  • If your fabric is dry-clean only, take it to a dry-cleaning professional for cleaning.

About the Author

Jessica Jewell is a writer, photographer and communications consultant who began writing professionally in 2005. Her chapbook, "Slap Leather," is forthcoming from dancing girl press. Her recent work has appeared in "Nimrod," "Harpur Palate," "Copper Nickel," "Rhino," "wicked alice," "Poetry Midwest" and "Barn Owl Review." Jewell was recently nominated for a Pushcart Prize. She earned her Master of Fine Arts from Kent State University.