How to Add an Outdoor Faucet

Outside faucets can be useful.

Outside faucets add convenience for outdoor chores and activities.Outside faucets add convenience for outdoor chores and activities.
Watering a garden, mixing concrete, using a sprinkler, washing a car, or filling a swimming pool all require an outside faucet. Just think of trying to fill a pool from inside the house. Adding an outside faucet to a home that does not have one can be a time-saving investment. Every home should have at least two outside faucets, one in the front of the house and another in back.

Drill a 1½-inch hole in the foundation if the faucet is going there. Push the faucet supply end through the hole and use masonry screws and a drill to secure the faucet to the foundation.

Connect the supply pipe to the supply end of the faucet and secure it to the faucet with a clamp.

Run the other end of the supply pipe over to the outlet side of an emergency shutoff valve and secure it with a clamp. Connect a second piece of supply pipe to the inlet side of the emergency shutoff valve. Secure the pipe with a clamp and run the other end of the supply pipe over to an existing water pipe.

Shut off the water supply and relieve the existing water pressure by turning on some of the faucets in the house.

Cut the existing water pipe with a pipe cutter and insert a T-fitting. A T-fitting is shaped like a T. This allows the addition of a side branch that comes off the main branch. Connect the new faucet to the side branch of the T-fitting.

Connect one of the remaining sides of the T-fitting to the water pipe that runs between the well (or main water supply) and the T-fitting. Connect the other side to the pipe to the line that runs between the T-fitting and the house. Add clamps to all three sides of the T-fitting.

Apply expanding foam sealant at the hole where the faucet comes out of the foundation wall.

Turn the water back on and check for leaks.

Things You Will Need

  • Drill
  • Masonry screws
  • Clamps
  • 1/2- to 3/4-inch water supply hose
  • Pipe cutter
  • T-fitting
  • Expanding foam sealant

About the Author

William Kinsey lives in Concord, N.C. He started writing articles in March 2009, which have appeared on Autos.com and CarsDirect.com. He currently holds a Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and a Master of Business Administration from the University of Phoenix. He also has several years experience as an outside plant engineer and planner with AT&T. He also currently owns and operates Sophisticated Curves, an online fashion mall that caters to the needs of plus size women.