How to Paint a Faux Stone Finish on Fabric

Faux finishing is a way to make something appear real when it is not.

Faux stones are popular on walls and fabric to make the surface appear 3-D and rustic. Choose a heavy fabric that will stand up well to the stiffening effect of paint. A heavy canvas or cotton fabric is ideal. The process of painting stones onto fabric is the same as painting stone onto the wall. The only difference is the type of paint you use. Fabric paint works best for the project, though acrylic paint is also suitable.

Preshrink the fabric by washing it on the hot water cycle. Dry the fabric on a low setting. Iron the fabric to remove any wrinkles.

Spread the fabric out flat on a large surface. Tape the underside of the fabric to the flat surface.

Use a roller or paintbrush to paint the fabric with the base color you choose. If your fabric is already the color you want for the base, skip this step.

Determine the pattern you want for the stone. You could use a standard stacked pattern, random stacked pattern or draw a template for a round or odd-size stone. If you choose to draw a template, use a heavy cardboard and cut the template out to create a stencil.

Tape the stone pattern onto the fabric with the ¾ inch painter's tape. The thickness of the tape provides the grout lines for your stone. If you are using a stencil, do not tape the fabric; place the stencil onto the fabric where you want the stone.

Use a rag to dab the untapped area or inside your stencil. Dab enough paint onto the area to create depth, but not enough to completely cover the base color. If you are using the stencil, remove it and allow the area to dry before moving on to the next stone.

Allow the paint to dry completely. Remove the tape from the fabric.

Add a few drops of water to the stone paint. With a small paintbrush dipped in in the watered down paint, soften the lines of the stones. Allow the fabric to dry to the touch before moving.

Things You Will Need

  • Iron
  • Ironing board
  • Large flat surface
  • Tape
  • Base-coat paint
  • Darker glaze overcoat
  • Paintbrush or roller
  • ¾-inch painter's tape
  • Heavy cardboard
  • Scissors
  • Rag or painting sponge
  • Small paintbrush

Tip

  • The base coat and darker glaze should belong to the same color spectrum.

About the Author

Based in Lakeland, FL., Heather Montgomery has been writing a popular celebrity parenting blog and several parenting and relationship articles since 2011. Her work also appears on eHow and Everyday Family and she focuses her writing on topics about parenting, crafts, education and family relationships. She is pursuing a Bachelor of Science in early education from Fort Hays State University.