How to Pick a Baldwin Door Lock

If you are locked outside your home and need to pick your Baldwin door lock, you need a few items to help you try to unlock all of the pins inside the tumbler.

If the door to your house is protected by a Baldwin lock, you can still pick it.If the door to your house is protected by a Baldwin lock, you can still pick it.
Although there are a few basic tools and skills, much of lock-picking comes down to a combination of luck and patience. You must only pick locks that belong to you, whether it is for amusement or if you are locked out.

Insert the tension wrench into the tumbler lock of the Baldwin door lock assembly. You need to keep a slight pressure on the wrench, so that when the pins are all picked, you are able to turn the lock.

Insert the pick into the keyhole and slowly rake it back and forth and up and down in order to set the pins into their pin holes. Depending on which type of Baldwin lock you have installed on your home, there may be a variety of pin and pin hole combinations. Continue to rake the pick backward and forward across the key hole until the pins reach the "shear" point, at which they are locked in place and permit the lock itself to turn.

Use the pick to feel around for each pin. Baldwin locks typically employ four to six pins depending on the lock's model and design. If you release and remove the tension wrench, you ought to hear slight clicks as the pins release from the shear point and the lock is reset. Although you have to use the pick to set each pin back to the shear point, at least you know that you are doing it correctly. If you have set each pin, but the lock still does not turn with pressure on the tension wrench, then the pins have been pushed too far up into the shaft interface and you have to start over again.

Apply less pressure on the tension wrench if you have had to start over. Since Baldwin locks are made with a higher quality of craftsmanship than standard door locks, you will need more tension and must try to set multiple pins at a time rather than doing one at a time.

Things You Will Need

  • Pick
  • Tension wrench

About the Author

David McGuffin is a writer from Asheville, N.C. and began writing professionally in 2009. He has Bachelor of Arts degrees from the University of North Carolina, Asheville and Montreat College in history and music, and a Bachelor of Science in outdoor education. McGuffin is recognized as an Undergraduate Research Scholar for publishing original research on postmodern music theory and analysis.