How to Use Faux Tin Tiles Around the Fireplace

A fireplace is often the focal point of a living space.
A fireplace is a decorative focal point for a living space.A fireplace is a decorative focal point for a living space.
Conveying both comfort and sophistication, the addition of tiles around a fireplace can make the area even more appealing. Tin tiles are traditionally used on ceilings and backsplashes in Victorian-era houses. Faux tin tiles are now made out of PVC and other plastic materials and then embossed, painted and finished to look like real tin. Faux tin tiles are easier to place and install, making them available for many home improvement projects.

Step 1

Choose the faux tin tiles you want to install. Tiles made of PVC or other materials are available and made to look like traditional tin tiles.

Step 2

Prepare the surface around the fireplace where you want to lay the tiles. Wipe it clean with a clean, damp rag and repair any loose plaster or drywall.

Step 3

Lay your tiles out on the floor or on a table in the pattern you want them to follow around the fireplace. Having them laid out ahead of time makes it easy to grab a tile and put it in the right place immediately.

Step 4

Use a yardstick or ruler to draw straight guidelines for your tiles. Make a guideline for each row and column whether or not you are placing them on an angle. This will keep your tiles straight.

Step 5

Apply a rubber- or urethane-based adhesive to the edges of the tile and allow it to evaporate for about 15 minutes before placing the tile.

Step 6

Press the tiles into place, and then paint a thin coat of adhesive around the tile to ensure that all of the tiles stay in place.

Step 7

Continue pressing tiles in your chosen pattern until the entire surface is covered.

Things You Will Need

  • Clean cloth
  • Contact cement
  • Paintbrush
  • Ruler or yardstick

About the Author

Michelle Hogan is a writer and the author of 13 books including the 2005 bestselling memoir, "Without a Net: Middle Class and Homeless (With Kids) in America." Hogan studied English at American University and has been writing professionally since 1998. Her work has appeared in "The New York Times," "Redbook," "Family Circle" and many other publications.