How to Attach Barbed Wire to Fence Post Stays

Barbed-wire fence stays are twisted wire holders that maintain the spacing of the multiple strands of the fence.

The stays commonly are mounted between posts. It serves the same basic purpose as the post, holding the wires in place. The stays are added to the fence after the wire is stretched from corner to corner and fastened to the line posts. The process uses some of the same basic hand tools used in a basic barbed-wire fencing project.

Search for the open end of the fence stay. The stay is made up of a single piece of wire looped around a closed end and then twisted around itself. One end is open and the other is the closed portion of the loop.

Place the open end of the fence stay over the top wire of the fence at the planned location of the stay. Twist the stay so the stay rotates down around the top fence wire. Using a screwdriver through the top loop of the stay improves the leverage for twisting the stay.

Continue twisting the stay until the open end of the stay reaches the next wire. The open end of the stay must line up with the next strand of the barbed wire fence. Continue twisting the stay past this wire. Continue the process until the closed loop at the top of the stay reaches the top wire. It may extend past the bottom wire.

Cut the stay wires off about 1 to 2 inches below the bottom fence wire. Use pliers to twist the end around the bottom wire to lock the stay in place.

Things You Will Need

  • Screwdriver
  • Wire cutter
  • Pliers

Tip

  • Place a stay either at the midpoint between fence posts or equally spaced so two or more stays can be placed between each post. The more stays are used, the stronger it makes the fence, reducing opportunities for animals to work their way between the wires and enhancing security.

About the Author

Keith Allen, a 1979 graduate of Valley City State College, has worked at a variety of jobs including computer operator, medical clinic manager, radio talk show host and potato sorter. For over five years he has worked as a newspaper reporter and historic researcher. His works have appeared in regional newspapers in North Dakota and in "North Dakota Horizons" and "Cowboys and Indians" magazines.