How to Find Yellowjacket Nests

The yellow jacket is a common species of wasp often considered a pest.

Yellowjackets can sting, so finding the nest protects public health.Yellowjackets can sting, so finding the nest protects public health.
A colony of yellowjackets build a nest near family homes or in public spaces. This poses a health threat because the wasps can deliver a hot, harmful sting if it becomes agitated.

Go outside on a bright sunny day. Face the direction of the sunlight in the area where you suspect the wasps built a nest.

Watch in the area for yellowjackets flying around. This type of wasp flies in straight lines and uses the same route for travelling to and from its nest. Find one insect, then try to find another, as it is usual for more than one to home in along the same flight path.

Watch for yellowjackets flying in the area. This type of wasp flies in straight lines, and uses the same route for travelling to and from its nest. Look for one insect and then try and find another, as it is usual more than one flies along the same flight path.

Tempt more wasps into the area by placing a jar of bait on the ground. Use cat food, cold meat or fruit jelly. With more wasps in the area, you will find it easier to trace them back to their nest.

Follow the direction of the wasp's flight by walking in the same direction it is flying , when it leaves the jar of bait. It should lead you to the area where the yellowjackets have their nest.

Search in the area where the wasp goes. Yellowjackets build nests in wall crevices, under bushes or in unused animal burrows. The nest. will appear as a grey, round object that appears to have a rough, paper-like texture.

Verify that it is the nest by looking for yellowjackets entering and exiting the nest. Then, check further in the area to detect more nests. Often yellowjackets build more than one nest in close proximity to another.

Things You Will Need

  • Bait
  • Jar

About the Author

Based in Bristol, Philippa Jones has been a music journalist and script writer since 2007, working across a range of radio programs in the U.K. and Australia. Her articles have appeared in "Impact Magazine," "The Mic" and in local newspapers. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in politics from the University of Nottingham.