How to Make Bamboo Back Scratchers

Backscratchers not only serve a functional purpose, they can also be used as office or room decor, hanging from a wall or being displayed on a desk.

You can even make a backscratcher yourself from practically any wood you choose. Bamboo is one such wood that can be used to make a backscratcher. It is an aesthetically pleasing wood and durable to boot. You'll just need some woodworking tools to make a backscratcher out of bamboo.

Retrieve a spatula from the kitchen and set in on a piece of uncut bamboo. The spatula should be about 12 inches long and approximately 1 inch wide and 1 inch deep. Cut a piece of bamboo approximately the same size.

Trace the outline of the spatula onto the bamboo wood. This will serve as your template to cut and form the backscratcher.

Put on safety glasses. Clamp the bamboo with the traced spatula template in a table vice.

Cut along the template with a jig saw, following the traced lines as closely as possible. Cut carefully as bamboo can easily splinter, ruining your project. You should now have a block of bamboo that resembles the same shape as the spatula.

Carve into the blunt end of or "blade" of the spatula with a wood carving knife to begin forming a "claw" with at least three throngs or teeth. Start by cutting into the bamboo at a 45 degree angle and "scooping" the blade up, making a spoon-like cut out. This will be the most laborious part of making the backscratcher.

Continue to carve and shape as necessary to create your "claw" like end. You'll want to have the "claw" be at least 3/4 inch wide, containing three distinct throngs.

Sand the bamboo backscratcher thoroughly to remove any splinters and to smooth the surface. Apply stain or paint, if desired thereafter.

Things You Will Need

  • Spatula
  • Saw
  • Marker
  • Safety glasses
  • Table vice
  • Jig saw
  • Wood carving knife
  • Sandpaper
  • Paint or stain

About the Author

Owen Richason grew up working in his family's small contracting business. He later became an outplacement consultant, then a retail business consultant. Richason is a former personal finance and business writer for "Tampa Bay Business and Financier." He now writes for various publications, websites and blogs.