Alternative Ceilings

Most homes sport a standard ceiling of flat sheetrock, plaster and paint.

Wooden Ceilings

Wooden ceilings add a rustic appearance to modern homes.Wooden ceilings add a rustic appearance to modern homes.
Though there is nothing wrong with this type of ceiling, some homeowners seek out alternatives to make their homes stand out from the crowd. When selecting an alternative ceiling type with the intention of selling, pick a ceiling type that appeals to most homeowners rather than just your own tastes.

Wooden ceilings are regaining their popularity. Wood provides an upscale but rustic touch to a home and a variety of finishes to work around any homeowner's budget. Wooden beams can run along ceilings, and paneling can cover up any unwanted wires and support structures.

Metal Ceilings

In Europe, metal is a popular ceiling material. In both beam and panel form, a metal ceiling provides a clean and contemporary look, which is common in high-rise lofts and art studios. A metal ceiling is a good investment because it will outlast a typical mineral ceiling, according to Buildings.com. To drown out noise and echoes, however, you must perforate the panels before installation.

Dome Ceilings

Though most ceilings are flat, a dome ceiling can enhance the look of a home and make a room appear bigger. This ceiling is a concave dome covered in plaster, sheetrock, paint or specialized paneling such as metal or wood. Crown molding often accents the dome shape around the base to give it a classic look.

Cathedral Ceilings

Though popular in Europe, the cathedral ceiling was an uncommon ceiling type in the United States for many years. This ceiling angles up from the walls and forms a peak at the top, usually in line with the rooftop itself. Similar to a dome shape, this type of ceiling adds depth and space to a room. A cathedral ceiling, however, costs more to heat, because hot air rises to the top of the ceiling rather than staying in the room.

About the Author

Shailynn Krow began writing professionally in 2002. She has contributed articles on food, weddings, travel, human resources/management and parenting to numerous online and offline publications. Krow holds a Bachelor of Science in psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles and an Associate of Science in pastry arts from the International Culinary Institute of America.