What Is a DB Sewing Machine Needle?

Sewing machines make most sewing tasks considerably easier than doing them by hand.

Intended Use

Different sewing machine and fabric types require different needles.Different sewing machine and fabric types require different needles.
Because different fabrics have unique properties, needles of different types are required to effectively sew these materials. DB sewing machine needles are one such type, intended for uses that may fall outside the range of standard sewing machine usage.

The DB line of Janome sewing machines is designed for industrial use. DB sewing machine needles are stronger than standard needles, which allows them to stand up to use with a variety of fabrics and other materials in an industrial setting. Industrial sewing machines have more powerful motors and operate at a faster rate of speed than household sewing machines, so industrial needles such as DB needles need to be strong enough to avoid breaking at higher speeds.

Shape

DB sewing machine needles feature a rounded shank, as opposed to the flat-backed shank on many other needle types. The shaft of DB needles is similar to that of standard sewing machine needles, as are the other needle components. DB needles are strong, though this is largely a matter of the metal they are made of and not the overall shape of the needle.

Available Sizes

To best meet the needs of industrial sewing machine users, DB sewing machine needles are available in several different sizes. In addition to the sizes commonly used for standard sewing machine needles, DB needles are available with larger or smaller shafts to allow for a wide variety of stitches from DB-compatible sewing machines.

Compatibility

Janome manufactures DB sewing machine needles specifically for use in its DB line of sewing machines. These machines are designed to accept the round shank at the top of the needle, ensuring a secure fit. Because of the differences in shape between DB sewing machine needles and some other needle varieties, DB needles may not fit correctly in other varieties of sewing machines aside from the line they are intended for.

About the Author

Born in West Virginia, Jack Gerard now lives in Kentucky. A writer and editor with more than 10 years of experience, he has written both articles and poetry for publication in magazines and online. A former nationally ranked sport fencer, Gerard also spent several years as a fencing coach and trainer.