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How to Remove Mildew From Thermal Back Curtains

Trying to keep warm during the cold winter months will cause your utility bills to rise. Fortunately, there are a few methods you can take to lower your utility bills while still staying nice and toasty. Thermal back curtains act as an installation against your windows.

Curtains provide privacy and allow you to control the amount of sunlight coming into the room.

Trying to keep warm during the cold winter months will cause your utility bills to rise. Fortunately, there are a few methods you can take to lower your utility bills while still staying nice and toasty. Thermal back curtains act as an installation against your windows. The thermal back curtains keep cold air from entering your home via the windows while keeping the warm air from escaping. However, since windows naturally produce condensation, the thermal back curtains could develop mildew growth. You should remove the mildew from the curtains as soon as possible to prevent the fungus from staining the curtains.

  1. Remove the curtains from the window and take them outside. Shake the curtains to remove surface dust, dirt and other debris.

  2. Set your washing machine on the gentle cycle with a cold-water temperature. Pour ¼ cup of laundry detergent and 1 cup of white vinegar into the washer’s drum. For front-loading washing machines, pour the laundry detergent in the detergent compartment and pour the vinegar in the bleach receptacle.

  3. Place the thermal back curtains inside the washing machine and close the washer’s door. Let the washer complete a full cycle.

  4. Remove the curtains immediately from the washer and place them in the dryer. Allow the curtains to tumble dry with low heat. If the curtains are silk, hang them from a line to air dry. Immediately remove the curtains from the dryer and place on the curtain rod. Keeping the curtains in the dryer for an extended period will create wrinkles.

Tip

Follow the washing instructions on the curtains' label.

About the Author

Amanda Flanigan began writing professionally in 2007. Flanigan has written for various publications, including WV Living and American Craft Council, and has published several eBooks on craft and garden-related subjects. Flanigan completed two writing courses at Pierpont Community and Technical College.