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How to Remove Bloodstains from Upholstery

Bloodstains are notoriously difficult to remove from fabric. They are even more difficult to remove when you cannot put the fabric in a washing machine. Luckily, there are reliable ways of removing bloodstains, whether they are fresh or have been sitting for weeks.

Things You Will Need

  • Cold water
  • Sponge
  • Club soda
  • Laundry detergent
  • Glycerin
  • Spray bottle

Bloodstains are notoriously difficult to remove from fabric.  They are even more difficult to remove when you cannot put the fabric in a washing machine.

Luckily, there are reliable ways of removing bloodstains, whether they are fresh or have been sitting for weeks.  These easy-to-follow steps will teach you how to remove bloodstains from upholstery.

  1. Blot the blood gently with a sponge. You want to lift the stain out, so do not scrub or press hard, because this will push the blood farther down, which, in turn, makes it more difficult to remove. Start along the edges of the stain and work your way to the center to avoid spreading it. If the blood has already dried, move on to the next step.
  2. Pour a mixture of equal parts cold water and club soda on the bloodstain. Never use hot water, because this can actually make the stain harder to remove. Continue blotting the stain with the sponge. Repeat this step until you no longer pick blood up with the sponge. Stains that have been sitting for a long time may require a more heavy-duty cleaning agent.
  3. Mix cold water, laundry detergent and glycerin together. Water should make up 80 percent of the mix, and the amount of detergent and glycerin should be equal. Pour the mixture into a spray bottle and shake vigorously to ensure it is mixed well. Spray two to three sprays on the stain, and scrub with a sponge in a circular motion. Once the stain is removed, pour cold water on the previously stained spot to remove the sprayed mixture. You can store the mixture for later use.

Things You Will Need

  • Cold water
  • Sponge
  • Club soda
  • Laundry detergent
  • Glycerin
  • Spray bottle

About the Author

Kenneth Coppens began his freelance writing career in 2008. His passions in life consist of extensive personal research on food, gardening and finding natural and eco-friendly alternatives to nearly all aspects of life.