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How to Make Homemade Shoe Cleats

Making your own shoe cleats is a creative way to give your feet extra grip when you are running. Cleats are especially important for athletes moving on soft and wet surfaces — snow and ice, for example. The cleats provide sole extensions that stick into the ground and give you additional stability as you walk or run.

Use a real pair of cleats as inspiration.

Making your own shoe cleats is a creative way to give your feet extra grip when you are running. Cleats are especially important for athletes moving on soft and wet surfaces — snow and ice, for example. The cleats provide sole extensions that stick into the ground and give you additional stability as you walk or run. You can create your own cleats in a matter of minutes with the right tools. Once they are complete, show off your cleats to family, friends and fellow athletes.

  1. Drill one No. 8 three-eighths-inch screw into the bottom of the sole — from the bottom of the sole and upward into the shoe — near the front of the shoe. Evenly space the remaining five three-eighths-inch screws to cover the front third of the sole.

  2. Drill one No. 8 half-inch screw into the bottom of the sole — in the same manner as in Step 1 — in the middle of the shoe. Evenly space the eleven remaining half-inch screws to cover the additional two-thirds of the sole. Skip to Step 3 if you wish to use smaller screws throughout the process.

  3. Drill No. 8 one-quarter-inch screws into the bottom of the sole — from the front to the heel — in the same manner as in steps 1 and 2. Space them evenly. Keep in mind that one-quarter-inch screws are more likely to fall out with repetitive use of the cleats.

About the Author

Jeffery Keilholtz began writing in 2002. He has worked professionally in the humanities and social sciences and is an expert in dramatic arts and professional politics. Keilholtz is published in publications such as Raw Story and Z-Magazine, and also pens political commentary under a pseudonym, Maryann Mann. He holds a dual Associate of Arts in psychology and sociology from Frederick Community College.