How to Build a Raised Bed Along a Fence

Raised beds are often used by gardeners to keep pests out of gardens and visually separate the garden from the surrounding area.
A raised bed can be built along a fence.A raised bed can be built along a fence.
These boxes are fairly simple with four sides made of wood. If you have a wooden fence you want to build your raised bed against, you only need to construct the three remaining walls and attach the box to the fence. This can save time, lumber and money. The box will have no bottom to allow for drainage.

Step 1

Cut four 11 1/4-inch pieces of 4-by-4 post with the saw. Use a tape measure and pencil to mark each section before sawing through the post.

Step 2

Stand two of these pieces against the wall of the fence, positioned as far apart as you want the bed's width to be.

Step 3

Drill two 1/16-inch-diameter pilot holes through the back of the fence into each post, then connect the posts to the fence with 3-inch galvanized wood screws.

Step 4

Cut three pieces of 2-by-12 board. One should match the desired width of your box, and the other two should be the length that you want the box to extend away from the fence.

Step 5

Position the two side boards against the outside edges of the fence posts, using a carpenter's square so they extend perpendicular from the fence.

Step 6

Drill two pilot holes through each side board and into the fence posts. Use wood screws and the screwdriver to attach them permanently.

Step 7

Screw the other two post sections to the other end of the side boards, positioned on the inside edge.

Step 8

Screw the longer board in place against the final two post sections to complete the box, with the fence making the fourth side.

Step 9

Fill the bottom half of the box with leaves, sticks and other lawn debris. Top this off with soil or compost.

Things You Will Need

  • 4-by-4 board
  • Saw
  • Pencil
  • Measuring tape
  • Drill
  • 1/16-inch bit
  • 3-inch galvanized wood screws
  • Screwdriver
  • 2-by-12 board
  • Carpenter's square
  • Lawn debris
  • Soil or compost

About the Author

Alex Smith began writing in 2006 and brings a combination of education and humor to various websites. He holds a Master of Arts in theater and works as a professional makeup and special-effects artist.