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How to Build a Rubber Tire Water Tank

Rubber tire water tanks are a two-stage process involving the construction (or destruction, really) of the tire water tank and the installation of the tank in the ground. Tanks can be set up for automatic refilling via external plumbing or can simply be filled semi-regularly from a long hose. By reusing a large and otherwise generally useless piece of waste you are improving the look of your yard and keeping a very large piece of trash from being placed in a landfill or burned. One large tire can be cut in half and used as two high-capacity water tanks.

Large used tires can be converted into practical water tanks.

Step 1

Remove any metal interiors until only the rubber of the tire remains. Cut the tire in half all the way around, working slowly and allowing the saw plenty of time to cut through any of the underwire that may be supporting the rubber. Flip the top half of the tire off and drag the tires to their installation locations.

Step 2

Pile dirt and rocks into the hole inside the tire, packing it into the space as much as possible to ensure a solid position. Fill the hole up to within five inches of the top.

Step 3

Mix the concrete and fill the remaining section of the hole, pushing the concrete into the corners and interior edges of the hole. Fill the hole up to the top with the concrete mix, then begin to fill the tank with water until the water level covers the concrete by at least five inches. Allow the concrete to slow cure in this way for three to four days to ensure a good seal before beginning to water animals with the tank.

Things You Will Need

  • Reciprocating saw
  • Metal blade
  • Concrete
  • Waterproof rubber sealant or caulking

Tip

  • Make water tanks out of smaller tires by simply cutting off the very top surface of the tire, or merely cutting holes in it for the animals to drink out of and then following the regular instructions to make a single, smaller drinking tank.

Warnings

  • Wear eye and hand protection when cutting the tire with the reciprocating saw; pieces of metal in the tire may fly out and cause eye or skin damage.
  • Wear gloves when mixing and distributing the concrete; concrete mix can dry out skin and cause rashes or skin issues in those with sensitive skin or allergies.

About the Author

Nat Fondell has been writing professionally since 2006. A former editor of the "North Park University Press," his work has appeared at scientific conferences and online, covering health, business and home repair. Fondell holds dual Bachelors of Arts degrees in journalism and history from North Park University and received pre-medical certification at Dominican University.

Photo Credits

  • NA/AbleStock.com/Getty Images