How to Calculate the Materials for a Tongue and Groove Ceiling

To ensure an efficient remodeling job, you need to know how much material you need for each part of the job.
A tape measure is an essential tool for this job.A tape measure is an essential tool for this job.
Knowing what you need ahead of time will prevent waste and time. You won't buy more than you need, and you won't have to make extra trips to the store. Tongue and groove ceiling paneling is sold by the square foot, so you'll need to make a few easy measurements and calculations to ensure that you get the right amount of material for your ceiling.

Step 1

Place a ladder or stepladder at one corner of the room. Place another ladder or stepladder at the opposite corner. Ask a friend or family member to help you measure.

Step 2

Have your friend or family member climb the first ladder or stepladder, and hand him the beginning a carpenter's tape measure. Stretching out the tape measure as you go, walk to the second ladder or stepladder, and climb it so that the tape measure is running straight across the room. Record the distance between the opposite corners of the room.

Step 3

Move the second ladder or stepladder to the other corner directly opposite the first ladder or stepladder. Have your friend or family member stay on the first ladder or stepladder, and once again, give him the beginning of the tape measure. Run the tape measure to the ladder or stepladder that you moved. Climb the ladder or stepladder, and take that measurement.

Step 4

Multiply the two figures together to determine the square footage of the ceiling. Use this figure when you're ordering your tongue and groove ceiling boards.

Things You Will Need

  • Ladders or stepladders
  • Carpenter's tape measure
  • Paper
  • Pencil
  • Calculator -- optional

About the Author

Based in Virginia, Nichole Liandi has been a freelance writer since 2005. Her articles have appeared on various print and online publications. Liandi has traveled extensively in Europe and East Asia and incorporates her experiences into her articles. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in history from West Virginia University.