How Can I Get Rid of Odor Coming From the Sprinklers of an Aerobic Treatment System?

An aerobic treatment system is an alternative to a conventional septic system.
They work by using oxygen and microorganisms to break down waste. A sprinkler system pumps out the treated, disinfected effluent and distributes it to the surface. You shouldn't notice any unpleasant odors if the treatment system is working properly. Odors that linger around the sprinklers may indicate a problem, such as an overloaded system or the failure of a component.

Step 1

Check the filters, seals and aerator. Call a technician if any of these components appear faulty or damaged.

Step 2

Add aerobic treatment system chlorine tablets in accordance with the schedule recommended by the installer. Place the new tablets in the chlorinator. Don't use chlorine intended for swimming pools.

Step 3

Have a technician pump out the aerobic tank. A buildup of matter could cause odor arising from the sprinklers. Have the tank pumped out annually to prevent future problems. The technician should also check that the pumps are working.

Step 4

Cut back on your water usage. Aerobic treatment systems can easily become overloaded. Avoid doing more than one load of laundry a day.

Step 5

Avoid dumping chemicals down the drains. These include caustic cleaners, paint, paint thinner and pesticides. Avoid flushing other inorganic materials, such as sanitary napkins, grease, coffee grounds, disposable diapers and condoms.

Step 6

Pour an enzyme septic cleaner down your drains periodically. These products replenish the supply of microorganisms that the aerobic treatment system needs to function properly. Use a product recommended by the manufacturer or installer. The directions will vary depending on the product, but in general, pour the product down the drains once a month.

Things You Will Need

  • Chlorine tablets
  • Enzyme septic cleaner

Tip

  • Maintain a healthy lawn or other vegetative cover over the sprinkler area. This absorbs the effluent distributed by the sprinklers.

Warning

  • Don't plant a vegetable garden or any other edible plants in the sprinkler area.

About the Author

Catherine Chase is a professional writer specializing in history and health topics. Chase also covers finance, home improvement and gardening topics. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in American studies from Skidmore College.