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How to Disassemble a Single Hung Sliding Window

The procedure for disassembling the sliding sash of single-hung window can seem mysterious a first glance, because the construction of the window appears seamless. If the window is a newer one, you should find levers located somewhere in the window frame or the frame of the sash to release it. If yours is an older sliding window, though, you may have to disassemble the window casing in order to get the sash out. Most of these older windows are double-hung, but the top panel is often painted in place, and they function like single-hung windows.

Windows with Jamb-Loaded Levers

There's no mystery to disassembling a single-hung window.

Step 1

Look for levers at the top of the window jamb and pop them out with a flat-head screwdriver. Pull out the sash stops from the top corners of the jamb.

Step 2

Lift the sash until you feel it disengage -- it must be open almost all the way and have cleared the balancers, which will come into view at the bottom of the window.

Step 3

Angle one side of the window toward you and pull it away from the jamb.

Windows with Tilt Levers

Step 1

Locate the tilt levers on the top of the movable part of the window. They are usually incorporated into the locks. If yours is a small window, there may be only one lever.

Step 2

Raise the window about 4 inches, then pull the tilt levers out until they lock. This disengages the top of the window from the jamb. Angle the top of the window toward you until it's horizontal.

Step 3

Angle one side of the window until that side clears the frame, then lift the window out of the frame.

Older Wooden Sash Windows

Step 1

Open the sliding part of the window -- which is usually the bottom part -- about 4 inches.

Step 2

Remove the stops from both sides of the frame, using a pry bar or flat-head screwdriver. Work the bar of screwdriver under the bottom of each stop and pry it gently out, then work along the stop, moving toward the top of the window, until it is free. Set it aside.

Step 3

Angle the top of the window toward you, then lift the window carefully out of the frame. Take the cords or chains off both sides and tie knots in the end to prevent them from disappearing behind the jamb.

Warning

  • You may have to use a hammer to tap the screwdriver or pry bar under the window stop of an older window. Tap gently, because the glass in older windows is fragile and shatters easily.
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