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How to Fix Sagging Cupboard Doors

Over time, even the best built cupboard and cabinet doors can begin to sag and bind a little. Just think about the number of times a kitchen cupboard door is opened in just one year--and then multiply that by 10 years--and even you would probably begin to sag a little. Fortunately, fixing a sagging cupboard door is a pretty straightforward job and often only takes a few minutes. Here's how to do it.

Start by figuring out why the door is sagging; often it's only a loose screw. Lift up on the sagging door to position it properly and tighten the screws holding the hinges in place. Most of the time the loose screw will be on the top hinge, so start by tightening that one, then tighten the rest of the screws as well.

If retightening the screws doesn't fix the problem, try replacing the screws with longer or wider screws, making sure they will fit into the openings on the hinges.

If new screws don't fix the problem, the hole is stripped and needs to be repaired. Take the cupboard door completely off the cabinet by removing all the screws. Put the screws into a small plastic bag and tape it onto the backside of the door so you won't lose them.

Put wood glue into the screw holes, then put the toothpicks or matches in. Wipe up any overflow glue that comes out of the holes and allow the glue to dry, usually overnight, but follow the instructions on the bottle.

Once the glue has dried, use a utility knife or small saw to cut the toothpicks off flush with the surrounding cabinet frame.

With the help of another person to hole the door and the hinges in place, mark the position of the screws.

Drill small pilot holes (smaller in diameter than the screw) to ensure a tight fit after installation, then holding the door onto the cabinet, install the screws.

Hand tighten the screws to allow yourself to make any small final adjustments to the position of the door.

Things You Will Need

  • Screwdriver
  • Wood glue
  • Utility knife
  • Wooden toothpicks or wooden matches (heads removed)
  • Cloth
  • Power drill

Tip

  • Toothpicks, and perhaps even matches, are handy around most houses, but they are made from soft wood and over time may give out. Instead, you could use pieces of thin hardwood dowel to provide a more permanent fix.

Warning

  • Be sure to remove the striking heads on the matches before you insert them into the stripped hinge hole. They will be close to each other and rubbing together could make them ignite.

About the Author

I learned home repair and maintenance hands on. Over the past 30 years I've built sheds, decks, fences and gates and planted numerous trees and shrubs. Inside I've done all the common jobs like repairing and installing toilets, plumbing and light fixtures plus I've transformed three basements from bare concrete floors and walls into warm , bright family rooms. I write on home maintenance and repair for DoItYourself.com and answer maintenance and repair questions online at MyHomeImprovement.com.