How to Attach a Chain-Link Fence to a House

Improve your home's safety and privacy by installing a chain-link fence.

Chain-link fencing improves home safety and security.Chain-link fencing improves home safety and security.
These popular fences are easy to install and maintain, and their versatility allows for quick and easy adjustments of location. In addition, you can thread privacy material through the links in the fence to create a privacy screen--a welcome barrier for pool areas or places where children may play. Although you can install a chain-link fence anywhere on your property, attaching a chain-link fence to a house is an effective way to close the gap between the fence and your home.

Dig a hole for the terminal post along the edge of the house. The hole should be 18 to 30 inches deep and roughly 10 inches in diameter.

Fill the hole with concrete mix. Sink the pole into the mix, providing no more than 6 inches of clearance between the pole and the side of the house. Level the post to ensure a neutral angle. Allow the concrete to cure for 24 hours.

Attach a brace band to the top of the pole after the concrete is set. Gently hammer the post cap into place. A terminal pole will require two brace bands--one at the top and one at the bottom.

Secure the fence to the brace band and ensure proper tension.

Things You Will Need

  • Shovel
  • Concrete mix
  • Terminal post
  • Level
  • 2 brace bands
  • Post cap
  • Hammer

Tip

  • Do not attach a brace band directly to the house--the installation would require puncturing the siding, and depending on the location of the fence, the attachment point may not align with a wall stud. Attach a fence to a fence pole.

Warning

  • When digging the hole for the terminal post, avoid pouring concrete in a way that might block underground lines or cause damage to the existing foundation.

About the Author

Jason Gillikin is a copy editor and writer who specializes in health care, finance and consumer technology. His various degrees in the liberal arts have helped him craft narratives within corporate white papers, novellas and even encyclopedias.