How to Cut a Cast-Iron Sink

Cast-iron sinks remind a lot of us of our grandmother's kitchen.

Learn how to cut a cast-iron sink.Learn how to cut a cast-iron sink.
However, cast iron is making a comeback these days, primarily because of the green movement. Most cast-iron sinks are made with more than 90 percent recycled materials. If you decide to buy a cast-iron sink, you may find one that you love, but it doesn't fit your sink's faucet. If it doesn't have the size or number of cutouts you want for your faucet, soap dispenser or sprayer, you can cut the cast iron sink to fit your needs.

Trace around your faucet or other accessories to make a template. Lay the accessory on a piece of paper and draw around the perimeter of the insertion point with a pencil. Cut the template out of the paper with a scissors.

Place your template on the cast iron sink where you'd like to cut out the hole. Trace around the outside of your template with a marking pen.

Place a pilot drill over the hole you drew. Drill a 1/4-inch hole through the sink in the center of your template shape. This will be your cutting guide.

Cut through the porcelain surface of your sink with a porcelain saw. Apply cutting oil in the area and cut around the shape you drew on the sink. Cut a smooth, beveled groove through the porcelain until you reach the metal base.

Cut through the metal base of the cast iron with a finish hole saw. Follow the hole you cut in Step 4.

Place your sink fixtures into the hole you cut to check the fit.

Things You Will Need

  • Porcelain drill kit (including pilot drill, porcelain saw, and finish hole saw)
  • Paper
  • Pencil
  • Scissors
  • Marking pen
  • Cutting oil

Tips

  • Since a special porcelain drill kit is expensive, ask your plumbing supply dealer if you can borrow or rent a porcelain drill kit.
  • Use plenty of cutting oil when cutting through your sink. Cut slowly and carefully.
  • Buy a bottle of touch-up in case you make any mistakes. Most plumbing suppliers sell a touch-up paint to match the color of your sink.

Warning

  • Hold the drill steadily to avoid chipping the porcelain coating.

About the Author

Tzvi Raphael has worked with Fortune 500 companies helping them to maximize their online brand exposure through innovative Web design, content, and marketing. Additionally, Raphael is a writer for multiple high-traffic blogs and websites including eHow and Weight Ladder.