How to Replace a Phone Jack in a 40 Year Old House

Traditional phone jacks use telephone wiring that runs throughout the house and connects to the main phone line coming in from the street.

A phone jack uses a face plate that attaches to the wall.A phone jack uses a face plate that attaches to the wall.
The wiring used for a phone line has not changed in many years. This means replacing a phone jack in a 40-year-old house is done the same way as a phone jack in any other house. Replace a phone jack in a 40-year-old house by first examining all of the phone jacks in the home.

Remove the screws that are securing the jack plate to the wall or electrical box with the flat head screwdriver. Pull the old telephone jack from the wall.

Examine the wires that are connected to the old jack to see how they are connected. The phone wires will be color-coded.

Unscrew each of the terminals on the back of the telephone jack with the Phillips head screwdriver and pull off the telephone wires.

Set the old telephone jack aside and then cut the ends off of the old telephone wires with the wire cutters. Trim about a ½ inch of insulation from the wires with the wire strippers.

Bend the tips of the electrical wires, with the pliers, and connect them to the terminals on the back of the new telephone jack. Match the color of the telephone wires to the color of the wires on the back of the telephone jack.

Tighten the terminals on the telephone jack with the Phillips head screwdriver. Secure the telephone jack to the wall or electrical outlet with the flat head screwdriver.

Things You Will Need

  • Flat head screwdriver
  • Phillips head screwdriver
  • Wire cutters
  • Wire strippers

Warning

  • Do not let the bare wires of the telephone cable touch each other.

About the Author

Cameron Easey has over 15 years customer service experience, with eight of those years in the insurance industry. He has earned various designations from organizations like the Insurance Institute of America and LOMA. Easey earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in political science and history from Western Michigan University.