How to Open a Kitchenaid Dryer Front

A broken dryer can be an extreme annoyance, especially when you have a washing machine full of wet clothes.

While you can always call a repair service, they may not be able to make anytime soon. Learning how to disassemble you dryer can allow you to make those repairs yourself. Removing the front panel of your Kitchenaid dryer will typically give you access to the major components and allow you to figure out just what went wrong.

Disconnect the dryer from the power outlet. Slide the dryer away from the wall a few inches so you can access the dryer vent in the back. Disconnect the dryer vent from the dryer. More than likely it will be attached by a metal clamp. Use a Phillips screwdriver to loosen the retaining screw. Slide the clamp up the dryer vent and disconnect the vent. Slide the dryer out away from wall even farther so you have ample room to work.

Use a flat head screwdriver to gently pry the front kick panel below the door away from the main cabinet. Pry it loose until it disengages from its top retaining clips. Lift the kick panel up to remove it from the lower retaining clips and set it aside.

Loosen the two screws on the bottom of the door panel. Remove the lint filter and cover. Underneath the lint filter are two screws. Remove them.

Insert your flat head screwdriver between the top panel and the front panel on the left side. Slide the screwdriver toward the center of the dryer until the retaining clips unlock. Do the same for the right side. Lift the top panel up. The top panel has a hinge in the back, so just lean it back on the control panel.

Remove the two screws at the top of the front panel. Disconnect the door switch wiring harness from the side of the dryer. Pull the front panel toward you. Lift it up and off the screws you loosened earlier and set it to the side of the dryer.

Things You Will Need

  • Phillips screwdriver
  • Flat-head screwdriver

Warning

  • Never work on your dryer while it is connected to the power outlet. Doing so creates a risk of serious injury from electrical shock.

About the Author

Michael Scott is a freelance writer and professor of justice studies at Westminster College in Salt Lake City, Utah, and is a former prosecutor. Scott has a J.D. from Emory University and is a member of the Utah State Bar. He has been freelancing since June 2009, and his articles have been published on eHow.com and Travels.com.