How to Get Stickers Off

Many purchased products come with stickers as labels communicating information about the product or how to use it.

Stickers and labels can be removed easily to change the display.Stickers and labels can be removed easily to change the display.
Stickers can also provide entertainment, decoration, or a way to state your opinion. However, a sticker does not have to be forever. There are methods to remove stickers before you use a product, as your tastes and loyalties change, or if the sticker was wrongly placed. Maintaining the integrity of the sticker while removing it takes practice, but the sticky residue can be cleaned up regardless of whether you want to keep the sticker for reuse.

Pry an edge of the sticker off the surface by wedging something sharp and thin between the sticker and the surface, such as a razor, knife or fingernail. Sometimes this is the most difficult part of the process. If you are unable to pry the sticker from the surface, skip to Step 3.

Grab the edges of the sticker and pull them out away from the attached surface until the entire sticker is removed. Pull the edges close to the surface over and across the face of the sticker for best results.

Place a hot, wet washcloth over the sticker if pulling is futile or some of the sticker paper remains on the surface. This saturates the remaining paper of the sticker so it can be scraped off with your nails or a sharp edge.

Cover the residue with baby oil for an hour if the sticker was on glass. Wipe the surface down with a dry cloth to complete the removal.

Wipe the surface with naphtha -- a volatile liquid hydrocarbon mixture -- or a bit of rubbing alcohol, if the surface is covered with a paint or finish that you do not wish to damage such as on a guitar or hardwood floors.

Things You Will Need

  • Razor blade
  • Knife
  • Wet cloth
  • Dry cloth
  • Baby oil
  • Naphtha
  • Rubbing alcohol

Warning

  • Be careful using sharp edges or volatile solutions as they can cause injury and harm.

About the Author

Annelies de Groot was first published in 2007. She has contributed to local east coast papers and has worked for environmental and educational nonprofits. She received her Bachelor of Arts degree from St. John's College in Maryland.