Cat 246B Skid Steer Specifications

The Caterpillar 246B Skid Steer Loader fits in the middle of the line of loaders offered by the Caterpillar Corporation.

Physical Specifications

Used for agriculture and construction endeavors, skid steer loaders maneuver using changes in speeds for the wheels on the opposite sides of the machine. The arms of the loader portion of the unit support a number of attachments.

Like most skid steers, the Cat 246B has a short wheel base of 45 inches. The overall length of the machine, including bucket, is 138 inches. If the bucket is removed, the skid steer is 110 inches long. Width of the 246B is 66 inches with a top of cab height of 82 inches. Ground clearance is 9 inches. The 246B’s standard equipment includes an operator cab with rollover protection.

Power Plant

Powered by the Cat 3044C engine, the 246B is rated at 82 gross horsepower. The four-cylinder diesel engine has a displacement of 201 cubic inches with a 4.7 inch stroke and 3.7 inch bore. The Cat 246B is capable of 6.9 miles per hour in both forward and reverse. Fuel capacity is 23.8 gallons. Both the drive system and the loader system are supplied by a standard flow hydraulic system, reaching a maximum pressure of 3,335 lbs. per square inch with a flow of 22 gallons per minute.

Operations

The Cat 246B Skid Steer lifts up to 1,750 lbs., according to the rated operating capacity published in the Caterpillar online brochure. Its breakout force, the amount of weight it can briefly move, is 4,600 lbs. utilizing the lift cylinder of the loader and 5,400 lbs. using the tilt cylinder. The 246B can lift its rated capacity to a height of 158 inches. Maximum height at dump is 122 inches. The 246B Skid Steer offers a 64-inch turning radius to the left but is a full foot sharper in turns to the right at 52 inches.

About the Author

Keith Allen, a 1979 graduate of Valley City State College, has worked at a variety of jobs including computer operator, medical clinic manager, radio talk show host and potato sorter. For over five years he has worked as a newspaper reporter and historic researcher. His works have appeared in regional newspapers in North Dakota and in "North Dakota Horizons" and "Cowboys and Indians" magazines.